Messier Observing Project

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Observations of Messier deep sky objects by 90 Millimeter Observatory.

The Astronomical League offers special recognition in the form of a Messier Program Certificate for those that have observed most or all of the Messier objects. Learn more about the Astronomical League Messier Program.

Statistics

Object type Fraction of objects Number of objects Fraction of observations Number of observations
Open Clusters 27.27 % 9 of 33 26 % 13 of 50
Globular Clusters 24.24 % 8 of 33 38 % 19 of 50
Planetary Nebulae Nebel 9.09 % 3 of 33 10 % 5 of 50
Galactic Nebulae 3.03 % 1 of 33 2 % 1 of 50
Galaxies 33.33 % 11 of 33 22 % 11 of 50
Star Clouds 3.03 % 1 of 33 2 % 1 of 50

Observations at a glance

Details Object Type Constellation Time Site Optics Aperture [mm] Rating Finding
–> M110 GX And 2016/01/02 22:16 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 150mm 150.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M32 GX And 2016/01/02 21:53 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 150mm 150.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M31 GX And 2016/01/02 21:01 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 150mm 150.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M12 GC Oph 2015/08/13 22:31 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M10 GC Oph 2015/08/13 22:23 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M92 GC Her 2015/08/13 22:11 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M25 OC Sgr 2015/08/13 22:00 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 1 Very prominent and very beautiful cluster
–> M23 OC Sgr 2015/08/13 21:43 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 1 Very prominent and very beautiful cluster
–> M18 OC Sgr 2015/08/13 21:34 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M24 SC Sgr 2015/08/13 20:59 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M4 GC Sco 2015/08/13 20:50 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M39 OC Cyg 2014/08/29 00:30 UT-05:00h Blue Mountain Vista Observatory 150mm 150.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M18 OC Sgr 2014/08/26 22:15 UT-05:00h Blue Mountain Vista Observatory 150mm 150.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M17 GN Sgr 2014/08/26 22:00 UT-05:00h Blue Mountain Vista Observatory 150mm 150.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M16 OC Ser 2014/08/26 21:07 UT-05:00h Blue Mountain Vista Observatory 150mm 150.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M22 GC Sgr 2013/09/03 22:51 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 120mm 120.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M64 GX Com 2013/05/04 23:09 UT-05:00h SGL 110 State Game Lands 120mm 120.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M104 GX Vir 2013/05/04 22:02 UT-05:00h SGL 110 State Game Lands 120mm 120.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M65 GX Leo 2013/05/04 21:51 UT-05:00h SGL 110 State Game Lands 120mm 120.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M66 GX Leo 2013/05/04 21:51 UT-05:00h SGL 110 State Game Lands 120mm 120.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M103 OC Cas 2012/10/16 21:43 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M10 GC Oph 2012/08/16 22:50 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M12 GC Oph 2012/08/16 22:30 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M14 GC Oph 2012/08/16 21:20 UT-05:00h Stefan Observatory 152mm 152.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M10 GC Oph 2012/08/16 21:01 UT-05:00h Stefan Observatory 152mm 152.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M12 GC Oph 2012/08/16 20:40 UT-05:00h Stefan Observatory 152mm 152.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M27 PN Vul 2012/07/26 00:13 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 60mm ETX 60.0 4 Averted vision required to percept object
–> M27 PN Vul 2012/07/25 23:55 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 60mm ETX 60.0 4 Averted vision required to percept object
–> M39 OC Cyg 2012/07/25 23:40 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 60mm ETX 60.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M39 OC Cyg 2012/07/25 23:30 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 60mm ETX 60.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M29 OC Cyg 2012/07/25 23:15 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 60mm ETX 60.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M29 OC Cyg 2012/07/25 22:55 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 60mm ETX 60.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M56 GC Lyr 2012/05/19 01:48 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 4 Averted vision required to percept object
–> M57 PN Lyr 2012/05/19 01:35 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M57 PN Lyr 2012/05/19 01:13 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M92 GC Her 2012/05/18 23:10 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M92 GC Her 2012/05/18 22:52 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M13 GC Her 2012/05/18 22:46 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M13 GC Her 2012/05/18 22:15 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M92 GC Her 2012/05/17 23:56 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 90mm 90.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M13 GC Her 2012/05/17 23:40 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 90mm 90.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M92 GC Her 2012/05/17 23:16 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 90mm 90.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M13 GC Her 2012/05/17 22:34 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 90mm 90.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M51 GX CVn 2012/03/14 22:51 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M97 PN UMa 2012/03/14 22:37 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 5 Object barely perceptable with averted vision
–> M108 GX UMa 2012/03/14 22:30 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 6 Perception of object is very questionable
–> M81 GX UMa 2012/03/14 22:17 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M82 GX UMa 2012/03/14 22:08 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M35 OC Gem 2012/03/11 21:32 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 90mm 90.0 1 Very prominent and very beautiful cluster
–> M44 OC Cnc 2012/03/11 21:11 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 90mm 90.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster

Observations

Object M110 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2016-01-02 at 22:16:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.6 mag
SQM reading: 20.20 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 150mm
Accessories AL Messier Program
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=85.7)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • Apparent size: 10.00′
    ×17.00′
  • M110 is just a faint goast of light.Visible with direct vision but really faint. Elongated? Not sure.


Object M32 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2016-01-02 at 21:53:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.6 mag
SQM reading: 20.20 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 150mm
Accessories AL Messier Program
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=85.7)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Apparent size: 6.00′
    ×8.00′
  • M32 exhibits a bright, almost stellar core with a faint glow surrounding the core.


Object M31 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2016-01-02 at 21:01:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.6 mag
SQM reading: 20.20 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 150mm
Accessories AL Messier Program
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=85.7)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Apparent size: 178.00′
    ×178.00′
  • Object exhibits a bright centrial core elongated north/south in PA 30 degrees.Faint extendtions on either side og central glow.


Object M12 (Globular cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 22:31:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Eyepiece Celestron XL 12mm (M=51.8)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • M12 is fainter then M10 but at this power appears grany. Somewhat irregular in shape.


Object M10 (Globular cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 22:23:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Eyepiece Celestron XL 12mm (M=51.8)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • M10 is a faint bbut evenly illumnated object. Not resolved.


Object M92 (Globular cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 22:11:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Eyepiece 8.8mm (M=70.6)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • M92 has a very bbright and compact core.At this power the cluster appears grainy. At lower powers the objsct appears as a bright fuzzy ball.


Object M25 (Open cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 22:00:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Accessories Easy target
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=23.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very prominent and very beautiful cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Character of cluster: E
  • Nice low power cluster. There are a few orange stars that highlight the cluster.


Object M23 (Open cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 21:43:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Accessories Easy targer
Eyepiece Celestron XL 12mm (M=51.8)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very prominent and very beautiful cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Shows an unusual shape
  • Character of cluster: E
  • Large cluster, almost fills the FOV. 50+ stars in an unusal shape.


Object M18 (Open cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 21:34:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Eyepiece Celestron XL 12mm (M=51.8)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Appears partly not resolved
  • Character of cluster: C
  • Small cluster. I count about 12 stars.


Object M24 (Star cloud)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 20:59:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Accessories easy target
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=23.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Appears resolved
  • This a very rich area of Sag. Many different magnituides of stars.


Object M4 (Globular cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 20:50:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Eyepiece Celestron XL 12mm (M=51.8)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • Appears resolved
  • M4 appears grainy at this power.


Object M39 (Open cluster)
Site Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Time 2014-08-29 at 00:30:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 150mm
Accessories Equuleus Session 2
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=44.4)
Session (se_300230)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Shows an unusual shape
  • Character of cluster: H
  • Large, 32′ cluster with about 20 5 to magnitude stars. Easy in any telescope.


Object M18 (Open cluster)
Site Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Time 2014-08-26 at 22:15:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 150mm
Accessories Equuleus Session 1
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=44.4)
Session (se_300224)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Character of cluster: C
  • About 15 stars in a very loose group. Easy to detect.


Object M17 (Galactic nebula)
Site Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Time 2014-08-26 at 22:00:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 150mm
Accessories Equuleus Session 1
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=44.4)
Session (se_300224)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Apparent size: 11.00′
    ×11.00′
  • Rich star field. This is the Swan or Omega Nebula. Elongated in a east/west postion.


Object M16 (Open cluster)
Site Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Time 2014-08-26 at 21:07:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 150mm
Accessories Equuleus Session 1
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=44.4)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Apparent size: 7.00′
    ×7.00′
  • Character of cluster: B
  • No nebulosity is visible tonight but the star cluster is easy to see. Two bright suns stand out on the south edge.


Object M22 (Globular cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2013-09-03 at 22:51:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece Celestron XL 12mm (M=83.3)
Session (se_300204)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • At 83x the outerlying stars are resolved. The cluster is conspicuious with direct vision.


Object M64 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 110 State Game Lands
Time 2013-05-04 at 23:09:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece Panoptic 19mm (M=52.6)
Session (se_300212)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • Apparent size: 5.00′
    ×10.30′
  • Almost stellar core with a faint extended halo. I can just make out the dark lane.


Object M104 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 110 State Game Lands
Time 2013-05-04 at 22:02:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 120mm
Accessories Double star in FOV is STF 1664
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)
Session (se_300212)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • Apparent size: 4.20′
    ×8.60′
  • at 37x this galaxy is in a nice FOV and includes the multible star STF 1664 which forms an arrow pointing to M104. At 52x the galaxy shows a bright core with some faint extentions. With averted vision I can detect the dark lane crossing over the core.


Object M65 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 110 State Game Lands
Time 2013-05-04 at 21:51:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 120mm
Accessories In same FOV as M66
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)
Session (se_300212)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • Moth galaxies are visible in the FOV at 37x. Easy to see with direct vision.


Object M66 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 110 State Game Lands
Time 2013-05-04 at 21:51:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 120mm
Accessories In same FOV as M65
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)
Session (se_300212)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • In same FOV with M65. Easy to see with direct vision.


Object M103 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-10-16 at 21:43:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Shows an unusual shape
  • Character of cluster: H
  • At 37x this is an easy target. the three brightest stars range from magnitude 7.2, 8.9 and 10.5. The 7.2 star appears to have a companion at almost the 9 o’clock position and is about magnitude 11. The 10.5 magnitude star ay the center of the cluster appears reddish. I count about 10 stars.


Object M10 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-08-16 at 22:50:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece 20mm (M=49.4)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • M10 appears a little brighter then M12 and much more compact. The light seems evenly distributed decreasing from center outward.


Object M12 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-08-16 at 22:30:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=70.6)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • M12 appears much fainter then I thought it would be but I can still see it with direct vision. 70x shows a faint irregular glow with a little grainyness.


Object M14 (Globular cluster)
Site Stefan Observatory
Time 2012-08-16 at 21:20:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece 20mm (M=49.4)
Session (se_300190)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • At 49x this object is cluster is very faint, just a smudge of light.


Object M10 (Globular cluster)
Site Stefan Observatory
Time 2012-08-16 at 21:01:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece 20mm (M=49.4)
Session (se_300190)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • Brighter thet M12 by at least a magnitude and more concentrated. The light seems evenly distributed growing fainter from center outward.


Object M12 (Globular cluster)
Site Stefan Observatory
Time 2012-08-16 at 20:40:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=70.6)
Session (se_300190)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • This object is much fainter then I expected but I can still see it with direct vision. The 14mm Radian shows a faint irregular glow with a little graineness to it. The 20mm Meade SW gives a little better view but not as good contrast.


Object M27 (Planetary nebula)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-07-26 at 00:13:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.4 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 60mm ETX
Eyepiece TMB 9mm (M=38.9)
Session (se_300163)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Averted vision required to percept object
  • 30x gives better contrast in the 60mm scope and the nebule takes on a rectangler appearence suggesting it dunbbell shape. Averted vision is still required to see this planetary.


Object M27 (Planetary nebula)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-07-25 at 23:55:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.4 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 60mm ETX
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=13.0)
Session (se_300163)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Averted vision required to percept object
  • With 13x M27 is a small faint wisp of light under the light pollution here at the observatory and rwquires averted vision to see well.


Object M39 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-07-25 at 23:40:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.4 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 60mm ETX
Eyepiece TMB 9mm (M=38.9)
Session (se_300163)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • At 39x the cluster nearly fills the FOV. About 20 stars ranging in magnitude 7 to 9.


Object M39 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-07-25 at 23:30:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.4 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 60mm ETX
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=13.0)
Session (se_300163)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • At 13x M39 is an easy target. About 12 stars ranging in magnitude 7 to 9. There is no concentration toward center.


Object M29 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-07-25 at 23:15:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.4 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 60mm ETX
Eyepiece TMB 9mm (M=38.9)
Session (se_300163)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Appears partly not resolved
  • At 39x M29 appears as a loose group of six stars ranging in magnitude 8.5 to 9.0. The stars fan outward on either side of the cluster. This cluster is very sparse and not well detached from the field stars.


Object M29 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-07-25 at 22:55:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.4 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 60mm ETX
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=13.0)
Session (se_300163)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Appears partly not resolved
  • As many times that I have observed this object, I’ve never understood why the comet hunter Charles Messier would include it in his list of objects to avoid. In 90mm and larger telescopes, M29 in an unremarkable cluster consisting of six loosly grouped stars with no concentration toward the center. However, using a 60mm telescope and a low power eyepiece, it starts to make sense. At 13x M29 appears as a small dim cluster of five 8th magnitude stars superimposed onto a hazy background.


Object M56 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-19 at 01:48:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Averted vision required to percept object
  • Gloubler cluster M56 at 37x is very faint and requires averted vision to see. Increasing to power to 71x improves the sky contrast but stills requires averted vision to see.


Object M57 (Planetary nebula)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-19 at 01:35:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=71.4)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • At 71x M57’s ring is very prominent and well defined. Greenish-Gray in color and the center in dark. Central star is not visible with this size telescope.


Object M57 (Planetary nebula)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-19 at 01:13:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • M57, a Planerary Nebula in Lyra appears as a tiny out of focus star at low power (37x). Greenish-Gray color and just a little darker center hinting at it’s ring like nature.


Object M92 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-18 at 23:10:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=71.4)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • At 71x the outer lying stars apear as grains of sand with a faint glow behind them.


Object M92 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-18 at 22:52:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • At 37x this cluster is smaller and more concentrated. The core appears much brighter then the outer lying stars.


Object M13 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-18 at 22:46:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=71.4)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Appears resolved
  • At 71x the outer lying stars as well as across the surface are resolves.


Object M13 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-18 at 22:15:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Appears resolved
  • At low power M13 is well resolved.


Object M92 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-17 at 23:56:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 90mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=65.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Higher power reveals the strong concestration toward center. The cluster is not resloved.


Object M13 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-17 at 23:40:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 90mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=65.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Appears resolved
  • At higher power M13 is resolved across the surface into pin points of light. I searched for the galaxy NGC6207 but I could not see it on this night.


Object M92 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-17 at 23:16:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 90mm
Accessories Easy target
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=33.7)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Low power shows a very small glow of light, a little fainter then M13. The core seems a bit more concentrated then M13. The cluster is not resolved in the 90mm refractor.


Object M13 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-17 at 22:34:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 90mm
Accessories Easy target
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=33.7)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Appears resolved
  • Low power shows a easily visable glow strongly concentrated toward the center. The cluster is flanked on the east by a 7th mag star and an 8th mag star to the south.


Object M51 (Galaxy)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-14 at 22:51:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=70.6)
Session (se_300151)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • M51 & NGC5195 are both visible in the FOV. M51 shows a bright core but no detail. NGC5195 is just a faint glow and nothing more.


Object M97 (Planetary nebula)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-14 at 22:37:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Filter Broadband
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=70.6)
Session (se_300151)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object barely perceptable with averted vision
  • I know this is listed as an easy object but it requires a broadband filter and averted vision to see at all. The object is evenly illuminated and appeard as a puff ball of dim light.


Object M108 (Galaxy)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-14 at 22:30:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece Panoptic 19mm (M=52.0)
Session (se_300151)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Perception of object is very questionable
  • Object is very faint and requires averted vision to detect.


Object M81 (Galaxy)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-14 at 22:17:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=70.6)
Session (se_300151)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • Appears mottled
  • Object exhibits a bright core surrounded by a decreasing outer halo.


Object M82 (Galaxy)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-14 at 22:08:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=70.6)
Session (se_300151)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • Apparent size: 11.50′
    ×22.90′
  • The best view comes at 70x. The object is mottled across the whole visible portion and I can detect a dark lane crossing the center. Object is elongated east-west.


Object M35 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-11 at 21:32:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm
Eyepiece Panoptic 19mm (M=47.9)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very prominent and very beautiful cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • M35 fills the FOV of the 19mm EP. I make it out to be 22′ in size. The clusters’ shape is somewhat like a fan. The center of the cluster is void of stars. I’m estimating about 50 stars with a wide range on magnitudes. There is an interesting chain of stars arcing along the western edge.


Object M44 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-11 at 21:11:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm
Accessories OC Easy Target
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=33.7)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • very sparse open cluster. easy target with the 90mm refractor. at 34x the cluster fills the FOV. This cluster makes me think I’m looking at a group of wide double stars. About 32 stars most of the same magnitude and blue in color.


Master data


Session (se_300151)
Site: 90 Millimeter Observatory
Begin: 2012-03-14 at 21:13:00-05:00
End: 2012-03-14 at 23:07:00-05:00
Weather: Clear and warm for a March night. It has been a mild winter and we are experinecing a spring like March,
Equipment: 152mm refractor
various EPs
Comments: Using the 152mm tonight and hoping to see a few galaxies here at the 90mm observatory.


Session (se_300163)
Site: 90 Millimeter Observatory
Begin: 2012-07-25 at 22:55:00-05:00
End: 2012-07-26 at 00:30:00-05:00
Weather: Upper 80’s with about 68% humidity, light breeze.
Equipment: Meade ETX 60, 27mm EFF eyepiece, 9mm TMB Planetary eyepiece.
Comments: First clear sky we’ve had in over three weeks. There are a few scattered high alitude clouds hanging around but of little consequnce.


Session (se_300190)
Site: Stefan Observatory
Begin: 2012-08-16 at 20:36:00-05:00
End: 2012-08-17 at 00:30:00-05:00
Weather: 78 degrees and very humid. You can see the moisture in the surrounding sky glow.
Equipment: 152mm refractor and various EP’s.
Comments: Stefan’s driveway. Stefan is a good friend who has invited me to observe with him at his home.


Session (se_300212)
Site: SGL 110 State Game Lands
Begin: 2013-05-04 at 20:30:00-05:00
End: 2013-05-05 at 02:00:00-05:00
Weather: It’s cool temp wise at this site and I was lucky enough to have a light jacket in the car. The sky is clear and steady.
Equipment: Orion 120mm f/8.3 refractor and the 90mm Megrez APO refractor.
Comments: This is my first trip to SGL 110 – State Game Lands. The Chesmont Astronomical Society calls this DS-2. It’s about a mile and a half on the dark side of route 182. Observing with me tonight is my friend Karl Krasley, his daugther Jill and her friend Scott. I should call this night “Observing with the Krasley’s”.


Session (se_300204)
Site: SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Begin: 2013-09-03 at 21:30:00-05:00
End: 2013-09-04 at 01:30:00-05:00
Weather: Weather conditions were just right for this night. A light cool breeze coming out of the north-east, no clouds with very transparenrt skies.
Equipment: Orion AstroView 120mm Refractor 1000mm f/8.3.
Various eyepieces.
Comments: It has been several week since the skies were clear and the weather favroable for observing. I wanted to get in some time under dark skies so I went to the state Game Land (SGL) at French Creek State Park with a few of the Chesmont and DVAA club members to try and observe some of the fainter deep sky objects.


Session (se_300224)
Site: Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Begin: 2014-08-26 at 21:30:00-05:00
End: 2014-08-26 at 23:30:00-05:00
Weather: Warm. Aound 80 degrees and humid. This was a real dew bath.
Equipment: 150mm Refractor 1200mm fl f/8.0
Comments: Equuleus Session 2
Just a bad night all around. Power supply died within 30 minutes, It was a dew bath right from the start. Some jerk with a little pick-up truck pulls in around 10:30 PM and floods the field with white light. Fred from CAS was there as was Al Lamperti and Bill from the DVAA. I wrapped it up early and headed home.


Session (se_300230)
Site: Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Begin: 2014-08-28 at 21:00:00-05:00
End: 2014-08-29 at 01:35:00-05:00
Weather: Cool, around 50 degrees and cloudless skies. Dry with a slight breeze.
Equipment: 150mm refractor, 1200mm @ f/6.
Comments: Equuleus Session 2
A much better night at BMVO. Cooler, drier air with a slight breeze which will help keep the dew down for most of the night. The Milky Way tonight is bright and seeing is good as is transparency. With me on the field tonight is Lou Berman, Josh and Tom Gizzillo from CAS and Al Lamperti and Karl Henry from DVAA.

Object: M10 (Globular cluster
in Oph)
Alias names: GCL49, NGC6254

 

RA: 16h 57.11m
Dec: -4° 05.9′
Size: 20.00′ ×
20.00′
m(vis): 6.6 mag
SB: 12.8 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
18″ (7/14/07): large, gorgeous GC at 225x, extends ~15′ in diameter and fills
most of the field. The cluster is sharply concentrated with an intense 5′ core
containing a huge number of resolved mag 13-15 stars over an unresolved
background glow and beautiful strings of stars in the halo. At 323x the core is
slightly elongated SW-NE, ~5’x4′ in size. Strings of stars crisscross the core
with a very small triangle of stars at the geometric center. At 393x, one of the
3 stars in this central triangle is a very close double. The core is pretty
uniformly rich and evenly resolved and does not compress towards the center.
17.5″ (7/15/99): beautifully resolved at 220x. The halo appears to extend to
nearly 14′ although the star density is very low in the outer edge of the halo.
The inner halo is sharply concentrated with a very bright 5’x4′ core which is
elongated SW-NE. The cluster is highly resolved into mag 12/13 stars from edge
to edge (too numerous to count) with the stars very densely packed over the
core. A second layer of mag 13/14 stars is superimposed over the core. The halo
contains a number of strings including a long string to the south which curves
east and a string to the north which curves west. Also two parallel linear
strings head N or NNE from the core.
13.1″ (6/19/82): very bright, fairly large, intense core richly covered with
fairly bright stars. Scores of stars are resolved in the outer halo.
8″: bright lively core highly resolved. The outer halo is highly resolved with
several long, distinct streamers.

Object: M103 (Open cluster
in Cas)
Alias names: NGC581, OCL326

 

RA: 1h 33.37m
Dec: 60° 39.5′
Size: 6.00′ ×
6.00′
m(vis): 7.4 mag
SB: 11.0 mags/sq.arcmin
stars: 10
brightestStar: 7.2
class: III2p
Registered by: Daniel Acker
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (10/20/84): 50-60 stars in cluster, fairly rich. Includes several bright
stars in a distinctive triangular wedge shape (mag 7.3 SAO 11822, mag 8.9 SAO
11824, mag 8.3 SAO 11826 and mag 8.3 SAO 11829) with a bright orange star east
of center.

Object: M104 (Galaxy
in Vir)
Alias names: IRAS12373-1120, MCG-2-32-20, NGC4594, PGC42407, SOMBREROGALAXY, UGCA293

 

RA: 12h 39.99m
Dec: -11° 37.4′
Size: 4.20′ ×
8.60′
m(vis): 8.3 mag
SB: 11.9 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: Sa-b
pa: 89
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (3/12/94): very bright, very large, elongated 3:1 E-W, 7.5’x2.5′. Very
prominent dust lane along the entire length of the major axis and divides the
core into two nonsymmetric sections. The prominent section of the core is just
north of the dark lane. Overall, the galaxy is brighter and much more extensive
to the N of the lane. The portion of the core and halo south of the dust lane is
much fainter, smaller and unconcentrated. A mag 10 star lies 4′ WSW.
13.1″ (4/24/82): very bright, large, very elongated, arms long and thin. A
prominent dark lane is visible along the length of the galaxy. Only a faint glow
is visible to the south of the dust lane.

Object: M108 (Galaxy
in UMa)
Alias names: IRAS11085+5556, KARA469, MCG9-18-98, NGC3556, PGC34030, UGC6225, ZWG267.48

 

RA: 11h 11.5m
Dec: 55° 40.4′
Size: 2.40′ ×
8.60′
m(vis): 10.6 mag
SB: 13.6 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
18″ (5/14/07): very bright, very large, elongated 4:1 WSW-ENE, ~8’x2′. This
striking galaxy has a very mottled, patchy appearance with the main body
appearing twisted or distorted. A few brighter patches or knots are visible
along the major axis with a prominent knot along the west side. The core region
is streaked with dust. The brightest portions of the two extensions have
slightly different orientations or central axes! The galaxy bulges out a bit on
the east end and the galaxy appears to bend a bit towards the north on the west
end adding to the asymmetry. A couple of faint stars are superimposed on the
eastern extension and close to the center is a prominent mag 12.5 star
masquerading as a bright, stellar nucleus. The Owl Nebula, M97, lies 48′ SE.
17.5″ (2/25/84): very bright, very large, edge-on 4:1 WSW-ENE, 8.0’x2.0′. A mag
12 star is superimposed just west of center (V = 12.5) appearing similar to a
bright stellar nucleus. Two fainter stars are also superimposed east of the
core. A bright knot is visible west of the core (1.3′ W of the star) and the
region near the core appears dusty. A mag 12 star is just south of the west end,
4.9′ from the center.
17.5″ (3/12/88): very bright, very large, a bright star is superimposed near the
center, knot visibile west of the core.
13″ (2/25/84): fairly bright, very elongated, stellar nucleus.

Object: M110 (Galaxy
in And)
Alias names: IRAS00376+4124, MCG7-2-14, NGC205, PGC2429, UGC426, ZWG535.14

 

RA: 0h 40.37m
Dec: 41° 41.1′
Size: 11.50′ ×
19.50′
m(vis): 7.9 mag
SB: 13.5 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: E
pa: 170
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″: bright, very large, elongated 5:2 NNW-SSE, 10’x4′, quite prominent but
only a gentle broad concentration. The brightest globular cluster G73 in M110
lies 6′ E of center.
8″ (10/4/80): fairly bright, large, elongated ~N-S, companion to M31.

Object: M12 (Globular cluster
in Oph)
Alias names: GCL46, NGC6218

 

RA: 16h 47.25m
Dec: -1° 56.9′
Size: 16.00′ ×
16.00′
m(vis): 6.1 mag
SB: 11.9 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
18″ (7/11/07): at 325x this globular nearly fills the field and extends roughly
11′ in diameter. Contains a very bright 3.5’x2.5′ oval core, extended WNW-ESE. A
mag 10 star with an orange tint is just south of the core, 2′ from the center.
Two other mag 10-11 stars lie 4′ N and 5′ ENE of center in the halo. The core is
plastered with an immense number of mag 12.5-13.5 stars and in the central 2′ is
an incredibly dense mat of mag 13.5 and fainter stars. Very irregular sprays of
stars emanate from the central region and form part of the very scraggly outer
halo.
17.5″ (7/15/99): at 220x this bright cluster is highly resolved over the entire
disc. Appears smaller than M10, perhaps 11′-12′ diameter with a fairly
well-defined 3.5′ core. Two bright field stars are embedded in the north edge of
the halo and a third bright star is off the following end. A mag 10 star is also
superimposed just off the SE edge of the core. A number of brighter resolved mag
12 stars appear to be grouped into pairs and trios. There are a couple of
hundred fainter stars in the central 8′ over unresolved haze. The outline is
very irregular and there are distinctive star-poor areas in the outer halo.
13.1″ (6/19/82) : bright, large, round, very intense core with faint stars
scattered over the core. The outer halo is highly resolved into scores of stars.
Slightly inferior to M10 in faint stars.
8″: the outer halo is well resolved and partial resolution of the core. There
are two or three brighter stars in the outer halo.

Object: M13 (Globular cluster
in Her)
Alias names: GCL45, HERCULESCLUSTER, NGC6205

 

RA: 16h 41.69m
Dec: 36° 27.7′
Size: 20.00′ ×
20.00′
m(vis): 5.8 mag
SB: 12.0 mags/sq.arcmin
Registered by: Daniel Acker
Hercules cluster
Notes by Dan Acker:
This is an easy target in any telescope.
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (7/9/94): several hundred stars in a 10′-12′ diameter with a bright
central core of 6′ diameter. Many stars are arranged in strings and loops
including a distinctive streamer attached on the SE side which heads south and
curves west forming a semicircle and another string is attached on the west side
of the core and precedes the cluster. Several chains of stars are also resolved
over the 6′ core. Running along the north edge of the core is a starless strip
or a long dark lane which separates the central region from the northern outer
halo members. A dark “lane” protrudes into the core on the SE side – this is one
of three dark lanes that converge forming a “Y” and referred to as the
“Propellor” (first described by Lord Rosse). N6207 lies 28′ NE and extremely
faint IC 4617 lies 14′ NNE.
8″: very bright, very large, round, highly resolved into several hundred stars
mag 11.5-13.5 over the entire disc. Includes several star chains and streamers.
Fairly easy naked-eye in dark sky.
Hercules cluster

Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (7/9/94): several hundred stars in a 10′-12′ diameter with a bright
central core of 6′ diameter. Many stars are arranged in strings and loops
including a distinctive streamer attached on the SE side which heads south and
curves west forming a semicircle and another string is attached on the west side
of the core and precedes the cluster. Several chains of stars are also resolved
over the 6′ core. Running along the north edge of the core is a starless strip
or a long dark lane which separates the central region from the northern outer
halo members. A dark “lane” protrudes into the core on the SE side – this is one
of three dark lanes that converge forming a “Y” and referred to as the
“Propellor” (first described by Lord Rosse). N6207 lies 28′ NE and extremely
faint IC 4617 lies 14′ NNE.
8″: very bright, very large, round, highly resolved into several hundred stars
mag 11.5-13.5 over the entire disc. Includes several star chains and streamers.
Fairly easy naked-eye in dark sky.


Object: M14 (Globular cluster
in Oph)
Alias names: NGC6402

 

RA: 17h 37.61m
Dec: -3° 14.8′
Size: 11.00′ ×
11.00′
m(vis): 7.6 mag
SB: 12.5 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (7/1/00): this bright, large, fairly symmetric globular appears elongated
~E-W and ~7’x5′ in size at 220x. The bright core is relatively large at 4′, very
lively and granular with a layer of very faint stars. At 280x, ~30 stars are
resolved in the small halo and at the edge of the intense core. A rich, even
sprinkling of faint stars cover the core. It was difficult to count the resolved
stars as numerous dim stars pop out with averted vision over the bright
background haze, but perhaps 60-70 stars in total were glimpsed.
17.5″ (7/16/88): bright, large, 25-30 very faint stars are resolved mostly at
the edges which have a ragged appearance.
13″ (7/5/83): fairly large, broad concentration. About a dozen very faint stars
are resolved across the disk. The outer halo fades out smoothly.

Object: M16 (Open cluster
in Ser)
Alias names: NGC6611, OCL54

 

RA: 18h 18.81m
Dec: -13° 47.1′
Size: 7.00′ ×
7.00′
m(vis): 6.0 mag
SB: 10.0 mags/sq.arcmin
class: II3mn
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (8/17/85): a thin dark “finger” extends towards the cluster, positioned
just south and beyond the two bright mag 9 stars near the center. This is an
extension of the wider projection seen previously several times and which is
better defined along the south edge.
13.1″ (8/15/82): the “Eagle Nebula” is a fairly bright 30′ nebulosity in a
striking outstretched eagle shape with a bright scattered cluster superimposed.
There is a considerable contrast gain to the nebulosity using a UHC or OIII
filter. With a UHC filter, a dark projection (called the “Star Queen”) enters on
the SE edge of the nebula and extends inward to the west. The cluster members
surrounding the “head” of the eagle include ten mag 8-10 stars and a bright pair
of mag 8.5 stars (8.2/8.8 at 27″). A dark triangular wedge is visible off the
north side.
13.1″ (5/26/84): dark protrusion fairly easy at 88x.

Object: M17 (Galactic nebula
in Sgr)
Alias names: LBN60, NGC6618, OCL44, OMEGA_NEBULA, OMEGANEBULA, SH2-45

 

RA: 18h 20.8m
Dec: -16° 11′
Size: 11.00′ ×
11.00′
m(vis): 6.0 mag
SB: 10.9 mags/sq.arcmin
nebulaType: EN+OCL
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (7/16/82): the “Swan Nebula” is very bright, very large, with fantastic
detail along the bright bar. Has a turbulent texture with dark areas near the
“hook”. A nebulous halo surrounds the brighter star to the S.
8″: very bright, large,very detailed. The brightest portion consists of a long
bright ray which hooks south at the west end. A fainter section oriented N-S
section follows. The main bar is mottled. The irregular hooked portion is
clearly mixed with a dark nebula intruding. Fainter nebulosity is visible N and
S of the main bar.

Object: M18 (Open cluster
in Sgr)
Alias names: NGC6613, OCL40

 

RA: 18h 19.9m
Dec: -17° 08.1′
Size: 9.00′ ×
9.00′
m(vis): 6.9 mag
SB: 11.4 mags/sq.arcmin
class: II3pn
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (8/1/92): at 100x, bright, scattered, includes three mag 9 stars and 10
mag 11 stars. The bright stars form a “V” asterism with the vertex to the NNE.
Includes a few wide double stars. At 220x, 40 stars are visible in a 7′
diameter, scattered but distinctive. The bright group of 15 stars forming the
“V” asterism are surrounded by a dark circular void. The rest of the cluster is
to the S and W of the “V”. Only a few faint stars are involved and the cluster
appears fully resolved.

Object: M22 (Globular cluster
in Sgr)
Alias names: ESO523-SC4, GCL99, NGC6656

 

RA: 18h 36.41m
Dec: -23° 54.2′
Size: 32.00′ ×
32.00′
m(vis): 5.2 mag
SB: 12.5 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (8/4/94): at 220x appears 10′ diameter although outliers may significantly
increase the total diameter. The very bright core is irregularly round and
3.5′-4′ diameter but not concentrated to the center. M22 is extensively resolved
to the center and there is no distinct nucleus. At the NE edge of the core is
rich small clump with 8-10 stars that collectively stands out well and an easy
bright pair is at the SE edge of the core. The very irregular halo appears more
extensive on the NE side and appears elongated SW-NE. Dark lanes appear to
intrude into the cluster and involve the surrounding region though this may be
an optical effect. This is the third brightest globular in integrated magnitude
(V = 5.2) and a difficult naked-eye object in a dark sky (fairly easy from
Australia, but not as obvious as I would have expected).
8″: very bright, very large, extremely rich. A few hundred mag 11-13 stars are
resolved and appears highly resolved down to the core. A bright clump is visible
in the NE section of the core. Varying magnitudes to the cluster members. M22 is
the second best globular for viewing from Northern California (next to M13,
although has brighter members).

Object: M23 (Open cluster
in Sgr)
Alias names: ESO589-SC22, NGC6494, OCL30

 

RA: 17h 57.08m
Dec: -18° 59.2′
Size: 27.00′ ×
27.00′
m(vis): 5.5 mag
SB: 12.4 mags/sq.arcmin
class: III1m
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (6/29/84): bright, large, rich, appears fully resolved. Very pretty open
cluster.
8″: bright, fairly large with long star lanes to the edge of the field.

Object: M24 (Star cloud
in Sgr)
RA: 18h 18.8m
Dec: -18° 33.1′
Size: 40.00′ ×
120.00′
Registered by: Daniel Acker

Object: M25 (Open cluster
in Sgr)
Alias names: ESO591-SC6, IC4725, OCL38

 

RA: 18h 31.78m
Dec: -19° 07′
Size: 29.00′ ×
29.00′
m(vis): 4.6 mag
SB: 11.7 mags/sq.arcmin
class: I2p
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (8/27/92): about 100 stars in 30′ field although fills 45′ field at 82x.
The densest portion in the center is a group of 7 fairly bright stars situated
between two bright stars mag 6.5 (U Sgr) and 8.0 oriented E-W. U Sagittarii
(6.3-7.0) is located at the E end and is the brightest star in the cluster. Just
south of this group is a long dark lane void of stars oriented E-W which appears
darker than the background. Bordering the S edge of this dark lane is an
elongated group of 10 stars including a nice evenly matched double star. To the
west of this string are two mag 9 and 10 stars oriented SW-NE. The cluster
includes several colored stars and is visible naked-eye just S of a mag 5 star.

Object: M27 (Planetary nebula
in Vul)
Alias names: ARO14, HE2-452, NGC6853, PK60-03.1, PK60-3.1, VV246, VV’521

 

RA: 19h 59.61m
Dec: 22° 43.1′
Size: 6.70′ ×
6.70′
m(vis): 7.0 mag
SB: 10.9 mags/sq.arcmin
magStar: 13.9
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
18″ (8/23/03): breathtaking view at 215x; with the fainter but larger outer
lobes increasing the dimensions to nearly 7.5’x6′ and the ends of the major axis
seem to open up and bulge out. With careful viewing, ~10 superimposed stars can
be counted including the easy mag 14 central star.
17.5″ (6/15/91): very bright, very large, 7’x6′, bright dumbbell lobes are
oriented SSW-NNE. The SSW lobe is brighter with a bright outer rim. Large
fainter sweeping side lobes fill in the dumbbell and reverse the major axis to
WNW-ESE. The planetary has an irregular surface brightness with a darker center.
At high power 5 or 6 stars are superimposed including the easy mag 13.8 central
star. Overall, this is the most impressive planetary.
8″ (9/25/81): central star visible at 200x. The fainter side lobes are
prominent.

Object: M29 (Open cluster
in Cyg)
Alias names: NGC6913, OCL168

 

RA: 20h 23.91m
Dec: 38° 32.1′
Size: 7.00′ ×
7.00′
m(vis): 6.6 mag
SB: 10.6 mags/sq.arcmin
class: III3p
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (9/9/83): M29 consists of two dozen stars mag 8 and fainter in a fairly
small trapezoidal outline well detached in the field. The six brightest mag 8
stars form two curving rows on the SW and NE ends. Appears loose with no dense
spots and seems fully resolved.

Object: M31 (Galaxy
in And)
Alias names: ANDROMEDANEBULA, MCG7-2-16, NGC224, PGC2557, UGC454, ZWG535.17

 

RA: 0h 42.74m
Dec: 41° 16.1′
Size: 61.70′ ×
189.10′
m(vis): 3.5 mag
SB: 13.4 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: Sb
pa: 35
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (7/5/86): the remarkable “Andromeda galaxy” is very bright, extremely
large, very elongated 4:1 SW-NE, about 2.5 length. Very large bright core
containing a stellar nucleus using direct vision. There are two black parallel
dust lanes along the NW side of the core. The galaxy extends beyond the star
cloud N206 located about 40′ SW of the core.

Object: M32 (Galaxy
in And)
Alias names: ARAK12, ARP168, IRAS00399+4035, MCG7-2-15, NGC221, PGC2555, UGC452, ZWG535.16

 

RA: 0h 42.7m
Dec: 40° 52′
Size: 6.50′ ×
8.50′
m(vis): 8.1 mag
SB: 12.2 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: E
pa: 170
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (8/24/84): very bright, moderately large, elongated 4:3 NNW-SSE, about
4’x3′, increases to small very bright core which is almost stellar. Located 24′
S of the center of M31.
8″: very bright, moderately large, round, 24′ S of M31.

Object: M35 (Open cluster
in Gem)
Alias names: NGC2168, OCL466

 

RA: 6h 09m
Dec: 24° 21′
Size: 28.00′ ×
28.00′
m(vis): 5.1 mag
SB: 12.1 mags/sq.arcmin
class: III2m
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
8″: very bright string cluster, very large, excellent field but not rich in
faint stars. Many of the stars are arrange in rows and loops. Visible naked-eye
in dark sky.

Object: M39 (Open cluster
in Cyg)
Alias names: NGC7092, OCL211

 

RA: 21h 31.71m
Dec: 48° 26′
Size: 32.00′ ×
32.00′
m(vis): 4.6 mag
SB: 11.9 mags/sq.arcmin
class: III2p
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (7/31/92): very bright, very large, about 30′ diameter, scattered.
Includes 18 bright stars mag 7-8. Most of the brighter stars form a triangular
outline although a few bright stars are inside and outside. The bright star at
the SE corner has about six faint stars close following. Includes several wide
double stars. The bright stars are superimposed on a background of 100-150 faint
stars. Fairly uniformly distributed though many stars are in short arcs and
winding lanes. The faint stars are no richer than the Milky Way concentration.
Best view with 20 Nagler at 100x.
13″ (9/9/83): ~75 stars visible at 62x including 15 bright stars.
8″: very bright, very large, 30′ diameter, triangle shape, includes four bright
stars mag 7 and ten fairly bright stars mag 8-9. Large and scattered so needs
very low power. Partial resolution in 8×50 binoculars. Naked-eye cluster in a
dark sky.
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (7/31/92): very bright, very large, about 30′ diameter, scattered.
Includes 18 bright stars mag 7-8. Most of the brighter stars form a triangular
outline although a few bright stars are inside and outside. The bright star at
the SE corner has about six faint stars close following. Includes several wide
double stars. The bright stars are superimposed on a background of 100-150 faint
stars. Fairly uniformly distributed though many stars are in short arcs and
winding lanes. The faint stars are no richer than the Milky Way concentration.
Best view with 20 Nagler at 100x.
13″ (9/9/83): ~75 stars visible at 62x including 15 bright stars.
8″: very bright, very large, 30′ diameter, triangle shape, includes four bright
stars mag 7 and ten fairly bright stars mag 8-9. Large and scattered so needs
very low power. Partial resolution in 8×50 binoculars. Naked-eye cluster in a
dark sky.

Object: M4 (Globular cluster
in Sco)
Alias names: ESO517-SC1, GCL41, NGC6121

 

RA: 16h 23.6m
Dec: -26° 31.5′
Size: 36.00′ ×
36.00′
m(vis): 5.4 mag
SB: 12.9 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
18″ (7/12/07): at 225x, the remarkable 10′ central region is bounded by a nearly
complete ring of stars with a prominent string (bar) of brighter stars oriented
SSW-NNE nearly bisecting the central region. The center of this ridge of stars
is intersected by a dense, elongated ring of stars with major axis E-W, with the
majority of the stars to the east of the bar. A wide, brighter pair of stars
(10.8/10.9 at 17″) to the SE of the bar has an orange tint. Sprays of stars
appear to emanate from the bar in all directions with a beautiful arc of stars
curving along the entire north side of the core. The outer halo is relatively
sparce but includes a number of brighter stars and appears to extend 15′-18′ in
diameter.
17.5″ (7/4/86): very bright, very large, 15′ diameter. Resolved into an
extremely dense swarm of several hundred stars with many stars arranged in
strings. Appears fully resolved at moderate power including the distinctive bar
extending N-S through the center. M4 is possibly the closest GC at a distance of
5600 light-years.
13.1″ (6/19/82): the core is beautifully resolved including the bar which
resolves into a number of faint stars. The halo is fully resolved with many star
lanes.
8″: superb resolution of mag 11-13 stars.

Object: M44 (Open cluster
in Cnc)
Alias names: BEEHIVECLUSTER, NGC2632, OCL507, PRAESEPE

 

RA: 8h 39.96m
Dec: 19° 40.4′
Size: 95.00′ ×
95.00′
m(vis): 3.1 mag
SB: 12.7 mags/sq.arcmin
class: II2m
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13″ or 17.5″. Bright naked-eye cluster.

Object: M51 (Galaxy
in CVn)
Alias names: ARP85, IRAS13277+4727, KCPG379A, MCG8-25-12, NGC5194, PGC47404, UGC8493, ZWG246.8

 

RA: 13h 29.88m
Dec: 47° 11.7′
Size: 6.60′ ×
10.80′
m(vis): 8.1 mag
SB: 12.5 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: Sbc
pa: 163
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (3/28/87): stunning spiral structure, connecting arm visible with direct
vision. Earliest observation with 17.5″ on 3/23/85.
13.1″ (4/24/82): very bright, very large, bright nucleus. Two winding spiral
arms are obvious with a dark gap between the arms on the W side. The connecting
arm to N5195 is definite although near my visual threshold. There is a sharp
bend in the outer arm at the south end of the galaxy which then trails faintly
north to N5195 located 4.6′ from center.
8″: bright, large, hint of spiral arms.

Object: M56 (Globular cluster
in Lyr)
Alias names: GCL110, NGC6779

 

RA: 19h 16.6m
Dec: 30° 11.2′
Size: 8.80′ ×
8.80′
m(vis): 8.4 mag
SB: 12.9 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (8/27/87): about 30 stars resolved including many mag 15 stars at 280x.
Resolution is evident over the entire disc and at the edges of the halo which
are difficult to define. Situated in a rich star field. Easy in 11×80 finder.
13.1″ (5/26/84): many faint stars and some brighter stars near the W edge.
13.1″ (8/16/82): a number of faint stars resolved, particularly at the W edge.
8″ (10/4/80): very grainy, ragged, few faint stars resolved.
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (8/27/87): about 30 stars resolved including many mag 15 stars at 280x.
Resolution is evident over the entire disc and at the edges of the halo which
are difficult to define. Situated in a rich star field. Easy in 11×80 finder.
13.1″ (5/26/84): many faint stars and some brighter stars near the W edge.
13.1″ (8/16/82): a number of faint stars resolved, particularly at the W edge.
8″ (10/4/80): very grainy, ragged, few faint stars resolved.

Object: M57 (Planetary nebula
in Lyr)
RA: 18h 53.59m
Dec: 33° 01.8′
Size: 2.40′ ×
3.00′
m(vis): 8.8 mag
SB: 10.7 mags/sq.arcmin
Registered by: Daniel Acker
Ring nebula

Object: M64 (Galaxy
in Com)
Alias names: BLACKEYEGALAXY, IRAS12542+2157, KARA559, MCG4-31-1, NGC4826, PGC44182, UGC8062, ZWG130.1

 

RA: 12h 56.73m
Dec: 21° 41′
Size: 5.00′ ×
10.30′
m(vis): 8.4 mag
SB: 12.4 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: Sa-b
pa: 115
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (4/29/84): very bright, large, oval 2:1 WNW-ESE, 6’x3′, small bright core,
almost stellar nucleus. The famous curved dark patch = “Blackeye” located NE of
the core is quite prominent and visible with direct vision. Located 55′ NE of
the tight double star 35 Comae.

Object: M65 (Galaxy
in Leo)
Alias names: ARP317, IRAS11163+1322, MCG2-29-18, NGC3623, PGC34612, UGC6328, ZWG67.54

 

RA: 11h 18.93m
Dec: 13° 05.5′
Size: 2.30′ ×
9.00′
m(vis): 9.2 mag
SB: 12.2 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: SBa
pa: 174
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (1/31/87): very bright, very large, very elongated N-S, 7.5’x2.0′, bright
core, stellar nucleus. A mag 12 star is west of the south end 2.1′ from the
center. Forms a remarkable trio with M66 20′ ESE and N3628 36′ NE. Requires low
power (31 Nagler) to easily fit all three in the same field.
13.1″ (4/10/86): very bright, elongated N-S, bright core is elongated, possible
stellar nucleus.

Object: M66 (Galaxy
in Leo)
Alias names: ARAK288, ARP16, MCG2-29-19, NGC3627, PGC34695, UGC6346, ZWG67.57

 

RA: 11h 20.26m
Dec: 12° 59.4′
Size: 4.10′ ×
9.10′
m(vis): 8.9 mag
SB: 12.6 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: SBb
pa: 173
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (1/31/87): very bright, large, elongated N-S, 5’x3′, bright elongated core
contains a stellar nucleus. Two spiral arms are visible although the western arm
is more prominent.
13.1″ (4/24/82): bright elongated core, stellar nucleus. A diffuse spiral arm
extends south and a second short arm extends to the east. A dark patch is
visible just east of the nucleus.

Object: M81 (Galaxy
in UMa)
Alias names: BODE’SNEBULAE, IRAS09514+6918, KCPG218A, MCG12-10-10, NGC3031, PGC28630, UGC5318, ZWG333.7

 

RA: 9h 55.56m
Dec: 69° 04.1′
Size: 11.50′ ×
24.90′
m(vis): 7.0 mag
SB: 13.1 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: Sb
pa: 157
Registered by: Daniel Acker
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (3/23/85): very bright, very large, elongated 2:1 NNW-SSE, about 16’x8′,
large oval bright middle, bright core, nearly stellar nucleus. Two mag 11.5 and
11.9 stars are superimposed in the halo at the south edge of the core. An easily
visible spiral arm is attached near these two stars at the S end of the core.
This arm curves due N along the E side and is well separated from the main body.
A second arm was suspected on 10/12/85 as a short extension curving around the
NNW end towards a mag 12 star at the WNW edge of the halo and was described as “shorter and much less prominent, though definitely seen” on 1/31/87. Mag 8.7
SAO 15020 (·1386 = 9.3/9.3 at 2″) lies 10′ SSW and the striking double star
·1387 = 10.7/10.7 at 9″ is 8′ SSW. Forms a very striking pair at low power with
M82 37′ N. The bright supernova 1993j was located 3′ SSW of the core and formed
a right triangle with the two mag 11.5/11.9 stars south of the core.
13″ (1/18/85): extremely faint arm attached at the SE end near two stars and
curves to the east.
8″: very bright, bright core, large oval halo, elongated NW-SE, two faint stars
involved.

Object: M82 (Galaxy
in UMa)
Alias names: 3C231, ARP337, IRAS09517+6954, KCPG218B, MCG12-10-11, NGC3034, PGC28655, UGC5322, URSAMAJORA, ZWG333.8

 

RA: 9h 55.9m
Dec: 69° 41′
Size: 5.10′ ×
10.50′
m(vis): 8.6 mag
SB: 12.7 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: Sd
pa: 65
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (10/12/85): very bright, large, edge-on 4:1 WSW-ENE, 10′ x 2.5′, large
bright irregular core. Very mottled with an unusually high surface brightness.
Unique appearance with several dark cuts oblique to the major axis including a
prominent wedge or cut nearly through the center. A mag 10 star is just south of
the SW end 5.8′ from the center
13″ (11/5/83): two obvious dark lanes.
8″: bright, spindle, mottled. A dark wedge cuts into the galaxy near the center
from the south side.

Object: M92 (Globular cluster
in Her)
Alias names: GCL59, NGC6341

 

RA: 17h 17.13m
Dec: 43° 08.3′
Size: 14.00′ ×
14.00′
m(vis): 6.5 mag
SB: 12.0 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
18″ (7/24/06): at 435x the cluster overfilled the 9′ field with several hundred
stars resolved stars. The 3′ to 4′ core itself was highly resolved into roughly
100 densely packed stars (including a very compact knot of stars) with long
streams of stars appearing to spiral out from the core.
17.5″: very bright, large, very high resolution of 150-200 stars many in curving
lanes. A tight knot of stars in the core is resolved.
13″ (6/29/84): highly resolution over entire disc, dozens of stars resolved in
bright core. A bright knot in the core is partially resolved at 416x.
8″ (7/9/80): very bright, moderately large. Well resolved into many long
streamers from the small bright nucleus and some core resolution.

Object: M97 (Planetary nebula
in UMa)
RA: 11h 14.8m
Dec: 55° 01.2′
Size: 2.83′ ×
2.83′
m(vis): 9.9 mag
SB: 11.9 mags/sq.arcmin
Registered by: Daniel Acker
Owl nebula

Observer: Daniel Acker

Offset for naked eye faintest star estimation, relative to OAL standard correlation:: -0.05 mag

Contact info:

  • dacker11@verizon.net

Site: 90 Millimeter Observatory
Longitude (positive east of Greenwich): -75.380000°
Latitude: 40.270000°
Time zone: UT-300 min

Site: Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Longitude (positive east of Greenwich): -75.000000°
Latitude: 40.000000°
Time zone: UT-300 min

Site: SGL 110 State Game Lands
Longitude (positive east of Greenwich): -76.145000°
Latitude: 40.551000°
Time zone: UT-300 min

Site: SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Longitude (positive east of Greenwich): -75.480000°
Latitude: 40.100000°
Time zone: UT-300 min

Site: Stefan Observatory
Longitude (positive east of Greenwich): -75.000000°
Latitude: 40.000000°
Time zone: UT-300 min

Optics: 120mm
Type: R
Vendor: Orion
Aperture: 120.0 mm
Focal length: 1000.0 mm
Light grasp (efficiency): 0.9600

Optics: 150mm
Type: R
Vendor: Celestron
Aperture: 150.0 mm
Focal length: 1200.0 mm
Light grasp (efficiency): 0.9000

Optics: 152mm
Type: R
Vendor: Explore Scientific
Aperture: 152.0 mm
Focal length: 988.0 mm
Light grasp (efficiency): 0.9800

Optics: 60mm ETX
Type: R
Vendor: Meade
Aperture: 60.0 mm
Focal length: 350.0 mm
Light grasp (efficiency): 0.9600

Optics: 90mm
Type: R
Vendor: Orion
Aperture: 90.0 mm
Focal length: 910.0 mm
Light grasp (efficiency): 0.9600

Optics: 90mm APO
Type: R
Vendor: Williams Optics
Aperture: 90.0 mm
Focal length: 621.0 mm
Light grasp (efficiency): 0.9600

Eyepiece: Celestron XL 12mm
Vendor: Celestron XL
Focal length: 12.0 mm
Apparent field of view: 60.0°

Eyepiece: Radian 14mm
Vendor: Tele Vue
Focal length: 14.0 mm
Apparent field of view: 60.0°

Eyepiece: Panoptic 19mm
Vendor: Tele Vue
Focal length: 19.0 mm
Apparent field of view: 68.0°

Eyepiece: 20mm
Vendor: Meade
Focal length: 20.0 mm
Apparent field of view: 68.0°

Eyepiece: EF 27mm
Vendor: Smart Astronomy
Focal length: 27.0 mm
Apparent field of view: 53.0°

Eyepiece: 8.8mm
Vendor: Explore Scientific
Focal length: 8.8 mm
Apparent field of view: 82.0°

Eyepiece: TMB 9mm
Vendor: TMB
Focal length: 9.0 mm
Apparent field of view: 58.0°

Filter: Broadband
Type: broad band

//

http://sorttable.js

Observations

Observations by Daniel Acker

Statistics

Click column headers to sort!

Object type Fraction of objects Number of objects Fraction of observations Number of observations
Open Clusters 27.27 % 9 of 33 26 % 13 of 50
Globular Clusters 24.24 % 8 of 33 38 % 19 of 50
Planetary Nebulae Nebel 9.09 % 3 of 33 10 % 5 of 50
Galactic Nebulae 3.03 % 1 of 33 2 % 1 of 50
Galaxies 33.33 % 11 of 33 22 % 11 of 50
Star Clouds 3.03 % 1 of 33 2 % 1 of 50

Observations at a glance

Click column headers to sort!

Details Object Type Constellation Time Site Optics Aperture [mm] Rating Finding
–> M110 GX And 2016/01/02 22:16 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 150mm 150.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M32 GX And 2016/01/02 21:53 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 150mm 150.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M31 GX And 2016/01/02 21:01 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 150mm 150.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M12 GC Oph 2015/08/13 22:31 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M10 GC Oph 2015/08/13 22:23 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M92 GC Her 2015/08/13 22:11 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M25 OC Sgr 2015/08/13 22:00 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 1 Very prominent and very beautiful cluster
–> M23 OC Sgr 2015/08/13 21:43 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 1 Very prominent and very beautiful cluster
–> M18 OC Sgr 2015/08/13 21:34 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M24 SC Sgr 2015/08/13 20:59 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M4 GC Sco 2015/08/13 20:50 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 90mm APO 90.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M39 OC Cyg 2014/08/29 00:30 UT-05:00h Blue Mountain Vista Observatory 150mm 150.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M18 OC Sgr 2014/08/26 22:15 UT-05:00h Blue Mountain Vista Observatory 150mm 150.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M17 GN Sgr 2014/08/26 22:00 UT-05:00h Blue Mountain Vista Observatory 150mm 150.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M16 OC Ser 2014/08/26 21:07 UT-05:00h Blue Mountain Vista Observatory 150mm 150.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M22 GC Sgr 2013/09/03 22:51 UT-05:00h SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range 120mm 120.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M64 GX Com 2013/05/04 23:09 UT-05:00h SGL 110 State Game Lands 120mm 120.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M104 GX Vir 2013/05/04 22:02 UT-05:00h SGL 110 State Game Lands 120mm 120.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M65 GX Leo 2013/05/04 21:51 UT-05:00h SGL 110 State Game Lands 120mm 120.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M66 GX Leo 2013/05/04 21:51 UT-05:00h SGL 110 State Game Lands 120mm 120.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M103 OC Cas 2012/10/16 21:43 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M10 GC Oph 2012/08/16 22:50 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M12 GC Oph 2012/08/16 22:30 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M14 GC Oph 2012/08/16 21:20 UT-05:00h Stefan Observatory 152mm 152.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M10 GC Oph 2012/08/16 21:01 UT-05:00h Stefan Observatory 152mm 152.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M12 GC Oph 2012/08/16 20:40 UT-05:00h Stefan Observatory 152mm 152.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M27 PN Vul 2012/07/26 00:13 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 60mm ETX 60.0 4 Averted vision required to percept object
–> M27 PN Vul 2012/07/25 23:55 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 60mm ETX 60.0 4 Averted vision required to percept object
–> M39 OC Cyg 2012/07/25 23:40 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 60mm ETX 60.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M39 OC Cyg 2012/07/25 23:30 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 60mm ETX 60.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M29 OC Cyg 2012/07/25 23:15 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 60mm ETX 60.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M29 OC Cyg 2012/07/25 22:55 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 60mm ETX 60.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster
–> M56 GC Lyr 2012/05/19 01:48 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 4 Averted vision required to percept object
–> M57 PN Lyr 2012/05/19 01:35 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M57 PN Lyr 2012/05/19 01:13 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M92 GC Her 2012/05/18 23:10 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M92 GC Her 2012/05/18 22:52 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M13 GC Her 2012/05/18 22:46 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M13 GC Her 2012/05/18 22:15 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 120mm 120.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M92 GC Her 2012/05/17 23:56 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 90mm 90.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M13 GC Her 2012/05/17 23:40 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 90mm 90.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M92 GC Her 2012/05/17 23:16 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 90mm 90.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M13 GC Her 2012/05/17 22:34 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 90mm 90.0 1 Very simple, prominent object
–> M51 GX CVn 2012/03/14 22:51 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M97 PN UMa 2012/03/14 22:37 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 5 Object barely perceptable with averted vision
–> M108 GX UMa 2012/03/14 22:30 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 6 Perception of object is very questionable
–> M81 GX UMa 2012/03/14 22:17 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 2 Object easily percepted with direct vision
–> M82 GX UMa 2012/03/14 22:08 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 152mm 152.0 3 Object perceptable with direct vision
–> M35 OC Gem 2012/03/11 21:32 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 90mm 90.0 1 Very prominent and very beautiful cluster
–> M44 OC Cnc 2012/03/11 21:11 UT-05:00h 90 Millimeter Observatory 90mm 90.0 3 Conspicuously seen cluster


Observations

Object M110 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2016-01-02 at 22:16:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.6 mag
SQM reading: 20.20 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 150mm
Accessories AL Messier Program
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=85.7)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • Apparent size: 10.00′
    ×17.00′
  • M110 is just a faint goast of light.Visible with direct vision but really faint. Elongated? Not sure.


Object M32 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2016-01-02 at 21:53:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.6 mag
SQM reading: 20.20 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 150mm
Accessories AL Messier Program
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=85.7)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Apparent size: 6.00′
    ×8.00′
  • M32 exhibits a bright, almost stellar core with a faint glow surrounding the core.


Object M31 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2016-01-02 at 21:01:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.6 mag
SQM reading: 20.20 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 150mm
Accessories AL Messier Program
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=85.7)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Apparent size: 178.00′
    ×178.00′
  • Object exhibits a bright centrial core elongated north/south in PA 30 degrees.Faint extendtions on either side og central glow.


Object M12 (Globular cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 22:31:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Eyepiece Celestron XL 12mm (M=51.8)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • M12 is fainter then M10 but at this power appears grany. Somewhat irregular in shape.


Object M10 (Globular cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 22:23:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Eyepiece Celestron XL 12mm (M=51.8)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • M10 is a faint bbut evenly illumnated object. Not resolved.


Object M92 (Globular cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 22:11:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Eyepiece 8.8mm (M=70.6)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • M92 has a very bbright and compact core.At this power the cluster appears grainy. At lower powers the objsct appears as a bright fuzzy ball.


Object M25 (Open cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 22:00:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Accessories Easy target
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=23.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very prominent and very beautiful cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Character of cluster: E
  • Nice low power cluster. There are a few orange stars that highlight the cluster.


Object M23 (Open cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 21:43:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Accessories Easy targer
Eyepiece Celestron XL 12mm (M=51.8)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very prominent and very beautiful cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Shows an unusual shape
  • Character of cluster: E
  • Large cluster, almost fills the FOV. 50+ stars in an unusal shape.


Object M18 (Open cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 21:34:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Eyepiece Celestron XL 12mm (M=51.8)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Appears partly not resolved
  • Character of cluster: C
  • Small cluster. I count about 12 stars.


Object M24 (Star cloud)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 20:59:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Accessories easy target
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=23.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Appears resolved
  • This a very rich area of Sag. Many different magnituides of stars.


Object M4 (Globular cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2015-08-13 at 20:50:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm APO
Eyepiece Celestron XL 12mm (M=51.8)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • Appears resolved
  • M4 appears grainy at this power.


Object M39 (Open cluster)
Site Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Time 2014-08-29 at 00:30:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 150mm
Accessories Equuleus Session 2
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=44.4)
Session (se_300230)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Shows an unusual shape
  • Character of cluster: H
  • Large, 32′ cluster with about 20 5 to magnitude stars. Easy in any telescope.


Object M18 (Open cluster)
Site Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Time 2014-08-26 at 22:15:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 150mm
Accessories Equuleus Session 1
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=44.4)
Session (se_300224)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Character of cluster: C
  • About 15 stars in a very loose group. Easy to detect.


Object M17 (Galactic nebula)
Site Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Time 2014-08-26 at 22:00:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 150mm
Accessories Equuleus Session 1
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=44.4)
Session (se_300224)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Apparent size: 11.00′
    ×11.00′
  • Rich star field. This is the Swan or Omega Nebula. Elongated in a east/west postion.


Object M16 (Open cluster)
Site Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Time 2014-08-26 at 21:07:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 150mm
Accessories Equuleus Session 1
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=44.4)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Apparent size: 7.00′
    ×7.00′
  • Character of cluster: B
  • No nebulosity is visible tonight but the star cluster is easy to see. Two bright suns stand out on the south edge.


Object M22 (Globular cluster)
Site SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Time 2013-09-03 at 22:51:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece Celestron XL 12mm (M=83.3)
Session (se_300204)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • At 83x the outerlying stars are resolved. The cluster is conspicuious with direct vision.


Object M64 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 110 State Game Lands
Time 2013-05-04 at 23:09:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece Panoptic 19mm (M=52.6)
Session (se_300212)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • Apparent size: 5.00′
    ×10.30′
  • Almost stellar core with a faint extended halo. I can just make out the dark lane.


Object M104 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 110 State Game Lands
Time 2013-05-04 at 22:02:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 120mm
Accessories Double star in FOV is STF 1664
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)
Session (se_300212)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • Apparent size: 4.20′
    ×8.60′
  • at 37x this galaxy is in a nice FOV and includes the multible star STF 1664 which forms an arrow pointing to M104. At 52x the galaxy shows a bright core with some faint extentions. With averted vision I can detect the dark lane crossing over the core.


Object M65 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 110 State Game Lands
Time 2013-05-04 at 21:51:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 120mm
Accessories In same FOV as M66
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)
Session (se_300212)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • Moth galaxies are visible in the FOV at 37x. Easy to see with direct vision.


Object M66 (Galaxy)
Site SGL 110 State Game Lands
Time 2013-05-04 at 21:51:00-05:00
Faintest star 6.0 mag
SQM reading: 20.89 mags/sq.arcsec
Seeing 1 (very good)
Optics 120mm
Accessories In same FOV as M65
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)
Session (se_300212)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • In same FOV with M65. Easy to see with direct vision.


Object M103 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-10-16 at 21:43:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Shows an unusual shape
  • Character of cluster: H
  • At 37x this is an easy target. the three brightest stars range from magnitude 7.2, 8.9 and 10.5. The 7.2 star appears to have a companion at almost the 9 o’clock position and is about magnitude 11. The 10.5 magnitude star ay the center of the cluster appears reddish. I count about 10 stars.


Object M10 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-08-16 at 22:50:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece 20mm (M=49.4)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • M10 appears a little brighter then M12 and much more compact. The light seems evenly distributed decreasing from center outward.


Object M12 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-08-16 at 22:30:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=70.6)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • M12 appears much fainter then I thought it would be but I can still see it with direct vision. 70x shows a faint irregular glow with a little grainyness.


Object M14 (Globular cluster)
Site Stefan Observatory
Time 2012-08-16 at 21:20:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece 20mm (M=49.4)
Session (se_300190)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • At 49x this object is cluster is very faint, just a smudge of light.


Object M10 (Globular cluster)
Site Stefan Observatory
Time 2012-08-16 at 21:01:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece 20mm (M=49.4)
Session (se_300190)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • Brighter thet M12 by at least a magnitude and more concentrated. The light seems evenly distributed growing fainter from center outward.


Object M12 (Globular cluster)
Site Stefan Observatory
Time 2012-08-16 at 20:40:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=70.6)
Session (se_300190)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • This object is much fainter then I expected but I can still see it with direct vision. The 14mm Radian shows a faint irregular glow with a little graineness to it. The 20mm Meade SW gives a little better view but not as good contrast.


Object M27 (Planetary nebula)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-07-26 at 00:13:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.4 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 60mm ETX
Eyepiece TMB 9mm (M=38.9)
Session (se_300163)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Averted vision required to percept object
  • 30x gives better contrast in the 60mm scope and the nebule takes on a rectangler appearence suggesting it dunbbell shape. Averted vision is still required to see this planetary.


Object M27 (Planetary nebula)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-07-25 at 23:55:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.4 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 60mm ETX
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=13.0)
Session (se_300163)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Averted vision required to percept object
  • With 13x M27 is a small faint wisp of light under the light pollution here at the observatory and rwquires averted vision to see well.


Object M39 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-07-25 at 23:40:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.4 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 60mm ETX
Eyepiece TMB 9mm (M=38.9)
Session (se_300163)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • At 39x the cluster nearly fills the FOV. About 20 stars ranging in magnitude 7 to 9.


Object M39 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-07-25 at 23:30:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.4 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 60mm ETX
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=13.0)
Session (se_300163)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • At 13x M39 is an easy target. About 12 stars ranging in magnitude 7 to 9. There is no concentration toward center.


Object M29 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-07-25 at 23:15:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.4 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 60mm ETX
Eyepiece TMB 9mm (M=38.9)
Session (se_300163)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Appears partly not resolved
  • At 39x M29 appears as a loose group of six stars ranging in magnitude 8.5 to 9.0. The stars fan outward on either side of the cluster. This cluster is very sparse and not well detached from the field stars.


Object M29 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-07-25 at 22:55:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.4 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 60mm ETX
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=13.0)
Session (se_300163)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • Appears partly not resolved
  • As many times that I have observed this object, I’ve never understood why the comet hunter Charles Messier would include it in his list of objects to avoid. In 90mm and larger telescopes, M29 in an unremarkable cluster consisting of six loosly grouped stars with no concentration toward the center. However, using a 60mm telescope and a low power eyepiece, it starts to make sense. At 13x M29 appears as a small dim cluster of five 8th magnitude stars superimposed onto a hazy background.


Object M56 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-19 at 01:48:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Averted vision required to percept object
  • Gloubler cluster M56 at 37x is very faint and requires averted vision to see. Increasing to power to 71x improves the sky contrast but stills requires averted vision to see.


Object M57 (Planetary nebula)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-19 at 01:35:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=71.4)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • At 71x M57’s ring is very prominent and well defined. Greenish-Gray in color and the center in dark. Central star is not visible with this size telescope.


Object M57 (Planetary nebula)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-19 at 01:13:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • M57, a Planerary Nebula in Lyra appears as a tiny out of focus star at low power (37x). Greenish-Gray color and just a little darker center hinting at it’s ring like nature.


Object M92 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-18 at 23:10:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=71.4)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • At 71x the outer lying stars apear as grains of sand with a faint glow behind them.


Object M92 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-18 at 22:52:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • At 37x this cluster is smaller and more concentrated. The core appears much brighter then the outer lying stars.


Object M13 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-18 at 22:46:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=71.4)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Appears resolved
  • At 71x the outer lying stars as well as across the surface are resolves.


Object M13 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-18 at 22:15:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 2 (good)
Optics 120mm
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=37.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Appears resolved
  • At low power M13 is well resolved.


Object M92 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-17 at 23:56:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 90mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=65.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Higher power reveals the strong concestration toward center. The cluster is not resloved.


Object M13 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-17 at 23:40:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 90mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=65.0)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Appears resolved
  • At higher power M13 is resolved across the surface into pin points of light. I searched for the galaxy NGC6207 but I could not see it on this night.


Object M92 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-17 at 23:16:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 90mm
Accessories Easy target
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=33.7)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Low power shows a very small glow of light, a little fainter then M13. The core seems a bit more concentrated then M13. The cluster is not resolved in the 90mm refractor.


Object M13 (Globular cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-05-17 at 22:34:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 5 (very poor)
Optics 90mm
Accessories Easy target
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=33.7)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very simple, prominent object
  • Appears resolved
  • Low power shows a easily visable glow strongly concentrated toward the center. The cluster is flanked on the east by a 7th mag star and an 8th mag star to the south.


Object M51 (Galaxy)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-14 at 22:51:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=70.6)
Session (se_300151)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • M51 & NGC5195 are both visible in the FOV. M51 shows a bright core but no detail. NGC5195 is just a faint glow and nothing more.


Object M97 (Planetary nebula)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-14 at 22:37:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Filter Broadband
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=70.6)
Session (se_300151)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object barely perceptable with averted vision
  • I know this is listed as an easy object but it requires a broadband filter and averted vision to see at all. The object is evenly illuminated and appeard as a puff ball of dim light.


Object M108 (Galaxy)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-14 at 22:30:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece Panoptic 19mm (M=52.0)
Session (se_300151)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Perception of object is very questionable
  • Object is very faint and requires averted vision to detect.


Object M81 (Galaxy)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-14 at 22:17:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=70.6)
Session (se_300151)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object easily percepted with direct vision
  • Appears mottled
  • Object exhibits a bright core surrounded by a decreasing outer halo.


Object M82 (Galaxy)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-14 at 22:08:00-05:00
Faintest star 5.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 152mm
Eyepiece Radian 14mm (M=70.6)
Session (se_300151)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Object perceptable with direct vision
  • Apparent size: 11.50′
    ×22.90′
  • The best view comes at 70x. The object is mottled across the whole visible portion and I can detect a dark lane crossing the center. Object is elongated east-west.


Object M35 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-11 at 21:32:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm
Eyepiece Panoptic 19mm (M=47.9)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Very prominent and very beautiful cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • M35 fills the FOV of the 19mm EP. I make it out to be 22′ in size. The clusters’ shape is somewhat like a fan. The center of the cluster is void of stars. I’m estimating about 50 stars with a wide range on magnitudes. There is an interesting chain of stars arcing along the western edge.


Object M44 (Open cluster)
Site 90 Millimeter Observatory
Time 2012-03-11 at 21:11:00-05:00
Faintest star 4.5 mag
Seeing 3 (moderate)
Optics 90mm
Accessories OC Easy Target
Eyepiece EF 27mm (M=33.7)

Visual impression

  • Rating:
    Conspicuously seen cluster
  • Appears resolved
  • very sparse open cluster. easy target with the 90mm refractor. at 34x the cluster fills the FOV. This cluster makes me think I’m looking at a group of wide double stars. About 32 stars most of the same magnitude and blue in color.


Master data


Session (se_300151)
Site: 90 Millimeter Observatory
Begin: 2012-03-14 at 21:13:00-05:00
End: 2012-03-14 at 23:07:00-05:00
Weather: Clear and warm for a March night. It has been a mild winter and we are experinecing a spring like March,
Equipment: 152mm refractor
various EPs
Comments: Using the 152mm tonight and hoping to see a few galaxies here at the 90mm observatory.


Session (se_300163)
Site: 90 Millimeter Observatory
Begin: 2012-07-25 at 22:55:00-05:00
End: 2012-07-26 at 00:30:00-05:00
Weather: Upper 80’s with about 68% humidity, light breeze.
Equipment: Meade ETX 60, 27mm EFF eyepiece, 9mm TMB Planetary eyepiece.
Comments: First clear sky we’ve had in over three weeks. There are a few scattered high alitude clouds hanging around but of little consequnce.


Session (se_300190)
Site: Stefan Observatory
Begin: 2012-08-16 at 20:36:00-05:00
End: 2012-08-17 at 00:30:00-05:00
Weather: 78 degrees and very humid. You can see the moisture in the surrounding sky glow.
Equipment: 152mm refractor and various EP’s.
Comments: Stefan’s driveway. Stefan is a good friend who has invited me to observe with him at his home.


Session (se_300212)
Site: SGL 110 State Game Lands
Begin: 2013-05-04 at 20:30:00-05:00
End: 2013-05-05 at 02:00:00-05:00
Weather: It’s cool temp wise at this site and I was lucky enough to have a light jacket in the car. The sky is clear and steady.
Equipment: Orion 120mm f/8.3 refractor and the 90mm Megrez APO refractor.
Comments: This is my first trip to SGL 110 – State Game Lands. The Chesmont Astronomical Society calls this DS-2. It’s about a mile and a half on the dark side of route 182. Observing with me tonight is my friend Karl Krasley, his daugther Jill and her friend Scott. I should call this night “Observing with the Krasley’s”.


Session (se_300204)
Site: SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Begin: 2013-09-03 at 21:30:00-05:00
End: 2013-09-04 at 01:30:00-05:00
Weather: Weather conditions were just right for this night. A light cool breeze coming out of the north-east, no clouds with very transparenrt skies.
Equipment: Orion AstroView 120mm Refractor 1000mm f/8.3.
Various eyepieces.
Comments: It has been several week since the skies were clear and the weather favroable for observing. I wanted to get in some time under dark skies so I went to the state Game Land (SGL) at French Creek State Park with a few of the Chesmont and DVAA club members to try and observe some of the fainter deep sky objects.


Session (se_300224)
Site: Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Begin: 2014-08-26 at 21:30:00-05:00
End: 2014-08-26 at 23:30:00-05:00
Weather: Warm. Aound 80 degrees and humid. This was a real dew bath.
Equipment: 150mm Refractor 1200mm fl f/8.0
Comments: Equuleus Session 2
Just a bad night all around. Power supply died within 30 minutes, It was a dew bath right from the start. Some jerk with a little pick-up truck pulls in around 10:30 PM and floods the field with white light. Fred from CAS was there as was Al Lamperti and Bill from the DVAA. I wrapped it up early and headed home.


Session (se_300230)
Site: Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Begin: 2014-08-28 at 21:00:00-05:00
End: 2014-08-29 at 01:35:00-05:00
Weather: Cool, around 50 degrees and cloudless skies. Dry with a slight breeze.
Equipment: 150mm refractor, 1200mm @ f/6.
Comments: Equuleus Session 2
A much better night at BMVO. Cooler, drier air with a slight breeze which will help keep the dew down for most of the night. The Milky Way tonight is bright and seeing is good as is transparency. With me on the field tonight is Lou Berman, Josh and Tom Gizzillo from CAS and Al Lamperti and Karl Henry from DVAA.

Object: M10 (Globular cluster
in Oph)
Alias names: GCL49, NGC6254

 

RA: 16h 57.11m
Dec: -4° 05.9′
Size: 20.00′ ×
20.00′
m(vis): 6.6 mag
SB: 12.8 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
18″ (7/14/07): large, gorgeous GC at 225x, extends ~15′ in diameter and fills
most of the field. The cluster is sharply concentrated with an intense 5′ core
containing a huge number of resolved mag 13-15 stars over an unresolved
background glow and beautiful strings of stars in the halo. At 323x the core is
slightly elongated SW-NE, ~5’x4′ in size. Strings of stars crisscross the core
with a very small triangle of stars at the geometric center. At 393x, one of the
3 stars in this central triangle is a very close double. The core is pretty
uniformly rich and evenly resolved and does not compress towards the center.
17.5″ (7/15/99): beautifully resolved at 220x. The halo appears to extend to
nearly 14′ although the star density is very low in the outer edge of the halo.
The inner halo is sharply concentrated with a very bright 5’x4′ core which is
elongated SW-NE. The cluster is highly resolved into mag 12/13 stars from edge
to edge (too numerous to count) with the stars very densely packed over the
core. A second layer of mag 13/14 stars is superimposed over the core. The halo
contains a number of strings including a long string to the south which curves
east and a string to the north which curves west. Also two parallel linear
strings head N or NNE from the core.
13.1″ (6/19/82): very bright, fairly large, intense core richly covered with
fairly bright stars. Scores of stars are resolved in the outer halo.
8″: bright lively core highly resolved. The outer halo is highly resolved with
several long, distinct streamers.

Object: M103 (Open cluster
in Cas)
Alias names: NGC581, OCL326

 

RA: 1h 33.37m
Dec: 60° 39.5′
Size: 6.00′ ×
6.00′
m(vis): 7.4 mag
SB: 11.0 mags/sq.arcmin
stars: 10
brightestStar: 7.2
class: III2p
Registered by: Daniel Acker
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (10/20/84): 50-60 stars in cluster, fairly rich. Includes several bright
stars in a distinctive triangular wedge shape (mag 7.3 SAO 11822, mag 8.9 SAO
11824, mag 8.3 SAO 11826 and mag 8.3 SAO 11829) with a bright orange star east
of center.

Object: M104 (Galaxy
in Vir)
Alias names: IRAS12373-1120, MCG-2-32-20, NGC4594, PGC42407, SOMBREROGALAXY, UGCA293

 

RA: 12h 39.99m
Dec: -11° 37.4′
Size: 4.20′ ×
8.60′
m(vis): 8.3 mag
SB: 11.9 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: Sa-b
pa: 89
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (3/12/94): very bright, very large, elongated 3:1 E-W, 7.5’x2.5′. Very
prominent dust lane along the entire length of the major axis and divides the
core into two nonsymmetric sections. The prominent section of the core is just
north of the dark lane. Overall, the galaxy is brighter and much more extensive
to the N of the lane. The portion of the core and halo south of the dust lane is
much fainter, smaller and unconcentrated. A mag 10 star lies 4′ WSW.
13.1″ (4/24/82): very bright, large, very elongated, arms long and thin. A
prominent dark lane is visible along the length of the galaxy. Only a faint glow
is visible to the south of the dust lane.

Object: M108 (Galaxy
in UMa)
Alias names: IRAS11085+5556, KARA469, MCG9-18-98, NGC3556, PGC34030, UGC6225, ZWG267.48

 

RA: 11h 11.5m
Dec: 55° 40.4′
Size: 2.40′ ×
8.60′
m(vis): 10.6 mag
SB: 13.6 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
18″ (5/14/07): very bright, very large, elongated 4:1 WSW-ENE, ~8’x2′. This
striking galaxy has a very mottled, patchy appearance with the main body
appearing twisted or distorted. A few brighter patches or knots are visible
along the major axis with a prominent knot along the west side. The core region
is streaked with dust. The brightest portions of the two extensions have
slightly different orientations or central axes! The galaxy bulges out a bit on
the east end and the galaxy appears to bend a bit towards the north on the west
end adding to the asymmetry. A couple of faint stars are superimposed on the
eastern extension and close to the center is a prominent mag 12.5 star
masquerading as a bright, stellar nucleus. The Owl Nebula, M97, lies 48′ SE.
17.5″ (2/25/84): very bright, very large, edge-on 4:1 WSW-ENE, 8.0’x2.0′. A mag
12 star is superimposed just west of center (V = 12.5) appearing similar to a
bright stellar nucleus. Two fainter stars are also superimposed east of the
core. A bright knot is visible west of the core (1.3′ W of the star) and the
region near the core appears dusty. A mag 12 star is just south of the west end,
4.9′ from the center.
17.5″ (3/12/88): very bright, very large, a bright star is superimposed near the
center, knot visibile west of the core.
13″ (2/25/84): fairly bright, very elongated, stellar nucleus.

Object: M110 (Galaxy
in And)
Alias names: IRAS00376+4124, MCG7-2-14, NGC205, PGC2429, UGC426, ZWG535.14

 

RA: 0h 40.37m
Dec: 41° 41.1′
Size: 11.50′ ×
19.50′
m(vis): 7.9 mag
SB: 13.5 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: E
pa: 170
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″: bright, very large, elongated 5:2 NNW-SSE, 10’x4′, quite prominent but
only a gentle broad concentration. The brightest globular cluster G73 in M110
lies 6′ E of center.
8″ (10/4/80): fairly bright, large, elongated ~N-S, companion to M31.

Object: M12 (Globular cluster
in Oph)
Alias names: GCL46, NGC6218

 

RA: 16h 47.25m
Dec: -1° 56.9′
Size: 16.00′ ×
16.00′
m(vis): 6.1 mag
SB: 11.9 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
18″ (7/11/07): at 325x this globular nearly fills the field and extends roughly
11′ in diameter. Contains a very bright 3.5’x2.5′ oval core, extended WNW-ESE. A
mag 10 star with an orange tint is just south of the core, 2′ from the center.
Two other mag 10-11 stars lie 4′ N and 5′ ENE of center in the halo. The core is
plastered with an immense number of mag 12.5-13.5 stars and in the central 2′ is
an incredibly dense mat of mag 13.5 and fainter stars. Very irregular sprays of
stars emanate from the central region and form part of the very scraggly outer
halo.
17.5″ (7/15/99): at 220x this bright cluster is highly resolved over the entire
disc. Appears smaller than M10, perhaps 11′-12′ diameter with a fairly
well-defined 3.5′ core. Two bright field stars are embedded in the north edge of
the halo and a third bright star is off the following end. A mag 10 star is also
superimposed just off the SE edge of the core. A number of brighter resolved mag
12 stars appear to be grouped into pairs and trios. There are a couple of
hundred fainter stars in the central 8′ over unresolved haze. The outline is
very irregular and there are distinctive star-poor areas in the outer halo.
13.1″ (6/19/82) : bright, large, round, very intense core with faint stars
scattered over the core. The outer halo is highly resolved into scores of stars.
Slightly inferior to M10 in faint stars.
8″: the outer halo is well resolved and partial resolution of the core. There
are two or three brighter stars in the outer halo.

Object: M13 (Globular cluster
in Her)
Alias names: GCL45, HERCULESCLUSTER, NGC6205

 

RA: 16h 41.69m
Dec: 36° 27.7′
Size: 20.00′ ×
20.00′
m(vis): 5.8 mag
SB: 12.0 mags/sq.arcmin
Registered by: Daniel Acker
Hercules cluster
Notes by Dan Acker:
This is an easy target in any telescope.
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (7/9/94): several hundred stars in a 10′-12′ diameter with a bright
central core of 6′ diameter. Many stars are arranged in strings and loops
including a distinctive streamer attached on the SE side which heads south and
curves west forming a semicircle and another string is attached on the west side
of the core and precedes the cluster. Several chains of stars are also resolved
over the 6′ core. Running along the north edge of the core is a starless strip
or a long dark lane which separates the central region from the northern outer
halo members. A dark “lane” protrudes into the core on the SE side – this is one
of three dark lanes that converge forming a “Y” and referred to as the
“Propellor” (first described by Lord Rosse). N6207 lies 28′ NE and extremely
faint IC 4617 lies 14′ NNE.
8″: very bright, very large, round, highly resolved into several hundred stars
mag 11.5-13.5 over the entire disc. Includes several star chains and streamers.
Fairly easy naked-eye in dark sky.
Hercules cluster

Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (7/9/94): several hundred stars in a 10′-12′ diameter with a bright
central core of 6′ diameter. Many stars are arranged in strings and loops
including a distinctive streamer attached on the SE side which heads south and
curves west forming a semicircle and another string is attached on the west side
of the core and precedes the cluster. Several chains of stars are also resolved
over the 6′ core. Running along the north edge of the core is a starless strip
or a long dark lane which separates the central region from the northern outer
halo members. A dark “lane” protrudes into the core on the SE side – this is one
of three dark lanes that converge forming a “Y” and referred to as the
“Propellor” (first described by Lord Rosse). N6207 lies 28′ NE and extremely
faint IC 4617 lies 14′ NNE.
8″: very bright, very large, round, highly resolved into several hundred stars
mag 11.5-13.5 over the entire disc. Includes several star chains and streamers.
Fairly easy naked-eye in dark sky.


Object: M14 (Globular cluster
in Oph)
Alias names: NGC6402

 

RA: 17h 37.61m
Dec: -3° 14.8′
Size: 11.00′ ×
11.00′
m(vis): 7.6 mag
SB: 12.5 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (7/1/00): this bright, large, fairly symmetric globular appears elongated
~E-W and ~7’x5′ in size at 220x. The bright core is relatively large at 4′, very
lively and granular with a layer of very faint stars. At 280x, ~30 stars are
resolved in the small halo and at the edge of the intense core. A rich, even
sprinkling of faint stars cover the core. It was difficult to count the resolved
stars as numerous dim stars pop out with averted vision over the bright
background haze, but perhaps 60-70 stars in total were glimpsed.
17.5″ (7/16/88): bright, large, 25-30 very faint stars are resolved mostly at
the edges which have a ragged appearance.
13″ (7/5/83): fairly large, broad concentration. About a dozen very faint stars
are resolved across the disk. The outer halo fades out smoothly.

Object: M16 (Open cluster
in Ser)
Alias names: NGC6611, OCL54

 

RA: 18h 18.81m
Dec: -13° 47.1′
Size: 7.00′ ×
7.00′
m(vis): 6.0 mag
SB: 10.0 mags/sq.arcmin
class: II3mn
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (8/17/85): a thin dark “finger” extends towards the cluster, positioned
just south and beyond the two bright mag 9 stars near the center. This is an
extension of the wider projection seen previously several times and which is
better defined along the south edge.
13.1″ (8/15/82): the “Eagle Nebula” is a fairly bright 30′ nebulosity in a
striking outstretched eagle shape with a bright scattered cluster superimposed.
There is a considerable contrast gain to the nebulosity using a UHC or OIII
filter. With a UHC filter, a dark projection (called the “Star Queen”) enters on
the SE edge of the nebula and extends inward to the west. The cluster members
surrounding the “head” of the eagle include ten mag 8-10 stars and a bright pair
of mag 8.5 stars (8.2/8.8 at 27″). A dark triangular wedge is visible off the
north side.
13.1″ (5/26/84): dark protrusion fairly easy at 88x.

Object: M17 (Galactic nebula
in Sgr)
Alias names: LBN60, NGC6618, OCL44, OMEGA_NEBULA, OMEGANEBULA, SH2-45

 

RA: 18h 20.8m
Dec: -16° 11′
Size: 11.00′ ×
11.00′
m(vis): 6.0 mag
SB: 10.9 mags/sq.arcmin
nebulaType: EN+OCL
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (7/16/82): the “Swan Nebula” is very bright, very large, with fantastic
detail along the bright bar. Has a turbulent texture with dark areas near the
“hook”. A nebulous halo surrounds the brighter star to the S.
8″: very bright, large,very detailed. The brightest portion consists of a long
bright ray which hooks south at the west end. A fainter section oriented N-S
section follows. The main bar is mottled. The irregular hooked portion is
clearly mixed with a dark nebula intruding. Fainter nebulosity is visible N and
S of the main bar.

Object: M18 (Open cluster
in Sgr)
Alias names: NGC6613, OCL40

 

RA: 18h 19.9m
Dec: -17° 08.1′
Size: 9.00′ ×
9.00′
m(vis): 6.9 mag
SB: 11.4 mags/sq.arcmin
class: II3pn
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (8/1/92): at 100x, bright, scattered, includes three mag 9 stars and 10
mag 11 stars. The bright stars form a “V” asterism with the vertex to the NNE.
Includes a few wide double stars. At 220x, 40 stars are visible in a 7′
diameter, scattered but distinctive. The bright group of 15 stars forming the
“V” asterism are surrounded by a dark circular void. The rest of the cluster is
to the S and W of the “V”. Only a few faint stars are involved and the cluster
appears fully resolved.

Object: M22 (Globular cluster
in Sgr)
Alias names: ESO523-SC4, GCL99, NGC6656

 

RA: 18h 36.41m
Dec: -23° 54.2′
Size: 32.00′ ×
32.00′
m(vis): 5.2 mag
SB: 12.5 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (8/4/94): at 220x appears 10′ diameter although outliers may significantly
increase the total diameter. The very bright core is irregularly round and
3.5′-4′ diameter but not concentrated to the center. M22 is extensively resolved
to the center and there is no distinct nucleus. At the NE edge of the core is
rich small clump with 8-10 stars that collectively stands out well and an easy
bright pair is at the SE edge of the core. The very irregular halo appears more
extensive on the NE side and appears elongated SW-NE. Dark lanes appear to
intrude into the cluster and involve the surrounding region though this may be
an optical effect. This is the third brightest globular in integrated magnitude
(V = 5.2) and a difficult naked-eye object in a dark sky (fairly easy from
Australia, but not as obvious as I would have expected).
8″: very bright, very large, extremely rich. A few hundred mag 11-13 stars are
resolved and appears highly resolved down to the core. A bright clump is visible
in the NE section of the core. Varying magnitudes to the cluster members. M22 is
the second best globular for viewing from Northern California (next to M13,
although has brighter members).

Object: M23 (Open cluster
in Sgr)
Alias names: ESO589-SC22, NGC6494, OCL30

 

RA: 17h 57.08m
Dec: -18° 59.2′
Size: 27.00′ ×
27.00′
m(vis): 5.5 mag
SB: 12.4 mags/sq.arcmin
class: III1m
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (6/29/84): bright, large, rich, appears fully resolved. Very pretty open
cluster.
8″: bright, fairly large with long star lanes to the edge of the field.

Object: M24 (Star cloud
in Sgr)
RA: 18h 18.8m
Dec: -18° 33.1′
Size: 40.00′ ×
120.00′
Registered by: Daniel Acker

Object: M25 (Open cluster
in Sgr)
Alias names: ESO591-SC6, IC4725, OCL38

 

RA: 18h 31.78m
Dec: -19° 07′
Size: 29.00′ ×
29.00′
m(vis): 4.6 mag
SB: 11.7 mags/sq.arcmin
class: I2p
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (8/27/92): about 100 stars in 30′ field although fills 45′ field at 82x.
The densest portion in the center is a group of 7 fairly bright stars situated
between two bright stars mag 6.5 (U Sgr) and 8.0 oriented E-W. U Sagittarii
(6.3-7.0) is located at the E end and is the brightest star in the cluster. Just
south of this group is a long dark lane void of stars oriented E-W which appears
darker than the background. Bordering the S edge of this dark lane is an
elongated group of 10 stars including a nice evenly matched double star. To the
west of this string are two mag 9 and 10 stars oriented SW-NE. The cluster
includes several colored stars and is visible naked-eye just S of a mag 5 star.

Object: M27 (Planetary nebula
in Vul)
Alias names: ARO14, HE2-452, NGC6853, PK60-03.1, PK60-3.1, VV246, VV’521

 

RA: 19h 59.61m
Dec: 22° 43.1′
Size: 6.70′ ×
6.70′
m(vis): 7.0 mag
SB: 10.9 mags/sq.arcmin
magStar: 13.9
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
18″ (8/23/03): breathtaking view at 215x; with the fainter but larger outer
lobes increasing the dimensions to nearly 7.5’x6′ and the ends of the major axis
seem to open up and bulge out. With careful viewing, ~10 superimposed stars can
be counted including the easy mag 14 central star.
17.5″ (6/15/91): very bright, very large, 7’x6′, bright dumbbell lobes are
oriented SSW-NNE. The SSW lobe is brighter with a bright outer rim. Large
fainter sweeping side lobes fill in the dumbbell and reverse the major axis to
WNW-ESE. The planetary has an irregular surface brightness with a darker center.
At high power 5 or 6 stars are superimposed including the easy mag 13.8 central
star. Overall, this is the most impressive planetary.
8″ (9/25/81): central star visible at 200x. The fainter side lobes are
prominent.

Object: M29 (Open cluster
in Cyg)
Alias names: NGC6913, OCL168

 

RA: 20h 23.91m
Dec: 38° 32.1′
Size: 7.00′ ×
7.00′
m(vis): 6.6 mag
SB: 10.6 mags/sq.arcmin
class: III3p
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (9/9/83): M29 consists of two dozen stars mag 8 and fainter in a fairly
small trapezoidal outline well detached in the field. The six brightest mag 8
stars form two curving rows on the SW and NE ends. Appears loose with no dense
spots and seems fully resolved.

Object: M31 (Galaxy
in And)
Alias names: ANDROMEDANEBULA, MCG7-2-16, NGC224, PGC2557, UGC454, ZWG535.17

 

RA: 0h 42.74m
Dec: 41° 16.1′
Size: 61.70′ ×
189.10′
m(vis): 3.5 mag
SB: 13.4 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: Sb
pa: 35
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (7/5/86): the remarkable “Andromeda galaxy” is very bright, extremely
large, very elongated 4:1 SW-NE, about 2.5 length. Very large bright core
containing a stellar nucleus using direct vision. There are two black parallel
dust lanes along the NW side of the core. The galaxy extends beyond the star
cloud N206 located about 40′ SW of the core.

Object: M32 (Galaxy
in And)
Alias names: ARAK12, ARP168, IRAS00399+4035, MCG7-2-15, NGC221, PGC2555, UGC452, ZWG535.16

 

RA: 0h 42.7m
Dec: 40° 52′
Size: 6.50′ ×
8.50′
m(vis): 8.1 mag
SB: 12.2 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: E
pa: 170
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (8/24/84): very bright, moderately large, elongated 4:3 NNW-SSE, about
4’x3′, increases to small very bright core which is almost stellar. Located 24′
S of the center of M31.
8″: very bright, moderately large, round, 24′ S of M31.

Object: M35 (Open cluster
in Gem)
Alias names: NGC2168, OCL466

 

RA: 6h 09m
Dec: 24° 21′
Size: 28.00′ ×
28.00′
m(vis): 5.1 mag
SB: 12.1 mags/sq.arcmin
class: III2m
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
8″: very bright string cluster, very large, excellent field but not rich in
faint stars. Many of the stars are arrange in rows and loops. Visible naked-eye
in dark sky.

Object: M39 (Open cluster
in Cyg)
Alias names: NGC7092, OCL211

 

RA: 21h 31.71m
Dec: 48° 26′
Size: 32.00′ ×
32.00′
m(vis): 4.6 mag
SB: 11.9 mags/sq.arcmin
class: III2p
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (7/31/92): very bright, very large, about 30′ diameter, scattered.
Includes 18 bright stars mag 7-8. Most of the brighter stars form a triangular
outline although a few bright stars are inside and outside. The bright star at
the SE corner has about six faint stars close following. Includes several wide
double stars. The bright stars are superimposed on a background of 100-150 faint
stars. Fairly uniformly distributed though many stars are in short arcs and
winding lanes. The faint stars are no richer than the Milky Way concentration.
Best view with 20 Nagler at 100x.
13″ (9/9/83): ~75 stars visible at 62x including 15 bright stars.
8″: very bright, very large, 30′ diameter, triangle shape, includes four bright
stars mag 7 and ten fairly bright stars mag 8-9. Large and scattered so needs
very low power. Partial resolution in 8×50 binoculars. Naked-eye cluster in a
dark sky.
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (7/31/92): very bright, very large, about 30′ diameter, scattered.
Includes 18 bright stars mag 7-8. Most of the brighter stars form a triangular
outline although a few bright stars are inside and outside. The bright star at
the SE corner has about six faint stars close following. Includes several wide
double stars. The bright stars are superimposed on a background of 100-150 faint
stars. Fairly uniformly distributed though many stars are in short arcs and
winding lanes. The faint stars are no richer than the Milky Way concentration.
Best view with 20 Nagler at 100x.
13″ (9/9/83): ~75 stars visible at 62x including 15 bright stars.
8″: very bright, very large, 30′ diameter, triangle shape, includes four bright
stars mag 7 and ten fairly bright stars mag 8-9. Large and scattered so needs
very low power. Partial resolution in 8×50 binoculars. Naked-eye cluster in a
dark sky.

Object: M4 (Globular cluster
in Sco)
Alias names: ESO517-SC1, GCL41, NGC6121

 

RA: 16h 23.6m
Dec: -26° 31.5′
Size: 36.00′ ×
36.00′
m(vis): 5.4 mag
SB: 12.9 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
18″ (7/12/07): at 225x, the remarkable 10′ central region is bounded by a nearly
complete ring of stars with a prominent string (bar) of brighter stars oriented
SSW-NNE nearly bisecting the central region. The center of this ridge of stars
is intersected by a dense, elongated ring of stars with major axis E-W, with the
majority of the stars to the east of the bar. A wide, brighter pair of stars
(10.8/10.9 at 17″) to the SE of the bar has an orange tint. Sprays of stars
appear to emanate from the bar in all directions with a beautiful arc of stars
curving along the entire north side of the core. The outer halo is relatively
sparce but includes a number of brighter stars and appears to extend 15′-18′ in
diameter.
17.5″ (7/4/86): very bright, very large, 15′ diameter. Resolved into an
extremely dense swarm of several hundred stars with many stars arranged in
strings. Appears fully resolved at moderate power including the distinctive bar
extending N-S through the center. M4 is possibly the closest GC at a distance of
5600 light-years.
13.1″ (6/19/82): the core is beautifully resolved including the bar which
resolves into a number of faint stars. The halo is fully resolved with many star
lanes.
8″: superb resolution of mag 11-13 stars.

Object: M44 (Open cluster
in Cnc)
Alias names: BEEHIVECLUSTER, NGC2632, OCL507, PRAESEPE

 

RA: 8h 39.96m
Dec: 19° 40.4′
Size: 95.00′ ×
95.00′
m(vis): 3.1 mag
SB: 12.7 mags/sq.arcmin
class: II2m
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13″ or 17.5″. Bright naked-eye cluster.

Object: M51 (Galaxy
in CVn)
Alias names: ARP85, IRAS13277+4727, KCPG379A, MCG8-25-12, NGC5194, PGC47404, UGC8493, ZWG246.8

 

RA: 13h 29.88m
Dec: 47° 11.7′
Size: 6.60′ ×
10.80′
m(vis): 8.1 mag
SB: 12.5 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: Sbc
pa: 163
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (3/28/87): stunning spiral structure, connecting arm visible with direct
vision. Earliest observation with 17.5″ on 3/23/85.
13.1″ (4/24/82): very bright, very large, bright nucleus. Two winding spiral
arms are obvious with a dark gap between the arms on the W side. The connecting
arm to N5195 is definite although near my visual threshold. There is a sharp
bend in the outer arm at the south end of the galaxy which then trails faintly
north to N5195 located 4.6′ from center.
8″: bright, large, hint of spiral arms.

Object: M56 (Globular cluster
in Lyr)
Alias names: GCL110, NGC6779

 

RA: 19h 16.6m
Dec: 30° 11.2′
Size: 8.80′ ×
8.80′
m(vis): 8.4 mag
SB: 12.9 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (8/27/87): about 30 stars resolved including many mag 15 stars at 280x.
Resolution is evident over the entire disc and at the edges of the halo which
are difficult to define. Situated in a rich star field. Easy in 11×80 finder.
13.1″ (5/26/84): many faint stars and some brighter stars near the W edge.
13.1″ (8/16/82): a number of faint stars resolved, particularly at the W edge.
8″ (10/4/80): very grainy, ragged, few faint stars resolved.
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (8/27/87): about 30 stars resolved including many mag 15 stars at 280x.
Resolution is evident over the entire disc and at the edges of the halo which
are difficult to define. Situated in a rich star field. Easy in 11×80 finder.
13.1″ (5/26/84): many faint stars and some brighter stars near the W edge.
13.1″ (8/16/82): a number of faint stars resolved, particularly at the W edge.
8″ (10/4/80): very grainy, ragged, few faint stars resolved.

Object: M57 (Planetary nebula
in Lyr)
RA: 18h 53.59m
Dec: 33° 01.8′
Size: 2.40′ ×
3.00′
m(vis): 8.8 mag
SB: 10.7 mags/sq.arcmin
Registered by: Daniel Acker
Ring nebula

Object: M64 (Galaxy
in Com)
Alias names: BLACKEYEGALAXY, IRAS12542+2157, KARA559, MCG4-31-1, NGC4826, PGC44182, UGC8062, ZWG130.1

 

RA: 12h 56.73m
Dec: 21° 41′
Size: 5.00′ ×
10.30′
m(vis): 8.4 mag
SB: 12.4 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: Sa-b
pa: 115
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
13.1″ (4/29/84): very bright, large, oval 2:1 WNW-ESE, 6’x3′, small bright core,
almost stellar nucleus. The famous curved dark patch = “Blackeye” located NE of
the core is quite prominent and visible with direct vision. Located 55′ NE of
the tight double star 35 Comae.

Object: M65 (Galaxy
in Leo)
Alias names: ARP317, IRAS11163+1322, MCG2-29-18, NGC3623, PGC34612, UGC6328, ZWG67.54

 

RA: 11h 18.93m
Dec: 13° 05.5′
Size: 2.30′ ×
9.00′
m(vis): 9.2 mag
SB: 12.2 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: SBa
pa: 174
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (1/31/87): very bright, very large, very elongated N-S, 7.5’x2.0′, bright
core, stellar nucleus. A mag 12 star is west of the south end 2.1′ from the
center. Forms a remarkable trio with M66 20′ ESE and N3628 36′ NE. Requires low
power (31 Nagler) to easily fit all three in the same field.
13.1″ (4/10/86): very bright, elongated N-S, bright core is elongated, possible
stellar nucleus.

Object: M66 (Galaxy
in Leo)
Alias names: ARAK288, ARP16, MCG2-29-19, NGC3627, PGC34695, UGC6346, ZWG67.57

 

RA: 11h 20.26m
Dec: 12° 59.4′
Size: 4.10′ ×
9.10′
m(vis): 8.9 mag
SB: 12.6 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: SBb
pa: 173
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (1/31/87): very bright, large, elongated N-S, 5’x3′, bright elongated core
contains a stellar nucleus. Two spiral arms are visible although the western arm
is more prominent.
13.1″ (4/24/82): bright elongated core, stellar nucleus. A diffuse spiral arm
extends south and a second short arm extends to the east. A dark patch is
visible just east of the nucleus.

Object: M81 (Galaxy
in UMa)
Alias names: BODE’SNEBULAE, IRAS09514+6918, KCPG218A, MCG12-10-10, NGC3031, PGC28630, UGC5318, ZWG333.7

 

RA: 9h 55.56m
Dec: 69° 04.1′
Size: 11.50′ ×
24.90′
m(vis): 7.0 mag
SB: 13.1 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: Sb
pa: 157
Registered by: Daniel Acker
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (3/23/85): very bright, very large, elongated 2:1 NNW-SSE, about 16’x8′,
large oval bright middle, bright core, nearly stellar nucleus. Two mag 11.5 and
11.9 stars are superimposed in the halo at the south edge of the core. An easily
visible spiral arm is attached near these two stars at the S end of the core.
This arm curves due N along the E side and is well separated from the main body.
A second arm was suspected on 10/12/85 as a short extension curving around the
NNW end towards a mag 12 star at the WNW edge of the halo and was described as “shorter and much less prominent, though definitely seen” on 1/31/87. Mag 8.7
SAO 15020 (·1386 = 9.3/9.3 at 2″) lies 10′ SSW and the striking double star
·1387 = 10.7/10.7 at 9″ is 8′ SSW. Forms a very striking pair at low power with
M82 37′ N. The bright supernova 1993j was located 3′ SSW of the core and formed
a right triangle with the two mag 11.5/11.9 stars south of the core.
13″ (1/18/85): extremely faint arm attached at the SE end near two stars and
curves to the east.
8″: very bright, bright core, large oval halo, elongated NW-SE, two faint stars
involved.

Object: M82 (Galaxy
in UMa)
Alias names: 3C231, ARP337, IRAS09517+6954, KCPG218B, MCG12-10-11, NGC3034, PGC28655, UGC5322, URSAMAJORA, ZWG333.8

 

RA: 9h 55.9m
Dec: 69° 41′
Size: 5.10′ ×
10.50′
m(vis): 8.6 mag
SB: 12.7 mags/sq.arcmin
hubbleType: Sd
pa: 65
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
17.5″ (10/12/85): very bright, large, edge-on 4:1 WSW-ENE, 10′ x 2.5′, large
bright irregular core. Very mottled with an unusually high surface brightness.
Unique appearance with several dark cuts oblique to the major axis including a
prominent wedge or cut nearly through the center. A mag 10 star is just south of
the SW end 5.8′ from the center
13″ (11/5/83): two obvious dark lanes.
8″: bright, spindle, mottled. A dark wedge cuts into the galaxy near the center
from the south side.

Object: M92 (Globular cluster
in Her)
Alias names: GCL59, NGC6341

 

RA: 17h 17.13m
Dec: 43° 08.3′
Size: 14.00′ ×
14.00′
m(vis): 6.5 mag
SB: 12.0 mags/sq.arcmin
Notes by Steve Gottlieb:
18″ (7/24/06): at 435x the cluster overfilled the 9′ field with several hundred
stars resolved stars. The 3′ to 4′ core itself was highly resolved into roughly
100 densely packed stars (including a very compact knot of stars) with long
streams of stars appearing to spiral out from the core.
17.5″: very bright, large, very high resolution of 150-200 stars many in curving
lanes. A tight knot of stars in the core is resolved.
13″ (6/29/84): highly resolution over entire disc, dozens of stars resolved in
bright core. A bright knot in the core is partially resolved at 416x.
8″ (7/9/80): very bright, moderately large. Well resolved into many long
streamers from the small bright nucleus and some core resolution.

Object: M97 (Planetary nebula
in UMa)
RA: 11h 14.8m
Dec: 55° 01.2′
Size: 2.83′ ×
2.83′
m(vis): 9.9 mag
SB: 11.9 mags/sq.arcmin
Registered by: Daniel Acker
Owl nebula

Observer: Daniel Acker

Offset for naked eye faintest star estimation, relative to OAL standard correlation:: -0.05 mag

Contact info:

  • dacker11@verizon.net

Site: 90 Millimeter Observatory
Longitude (positive east of Greenwich): -75.380000°
Latitude: 40.270000°
Time zone: UT-300 min

Site: Blue Mountain Vista Observatory
Longitude (positive east of Greenwich): -75.000000°
Latitude: 40.000000°
Time zone: UT-300 min

Site: SGL 110 State Game Lands
Longitude (positive east of Greenwich): -76.145000°
Latitude: 40.551000°
Time zone: UT-300 min

Site: SGL 43 French Creek Gun Range
Longitude (positive east of Greenwich): -75.480000°
Latitude: 40.100000°
Time zone: UT-300 min

Site: Stefan Observatory
Longitude (positive east of Greenwich): -75.000000°
Latitude: 40.000000°
Time zone: UT-300 min

Optics: 120mm
Type: R
Vendor: Orion
Aperture: 120.0 mm
Focal length: 1000.0 mm
Light grasp (efficiency): 0.9600

Optics: 150mm
Type: R
Vendor: Celestron
Aperture: 150.0 mm
Focal length: 1200.0 mm
Light grasp (efficiency): 0.9000

Optics: 152mm
Type: R
Vendor: Explore Scientific
Aperture: 152.0 mm
Focal length: 988.0 mm
Light grasp (efficiency): 0.9800

Optics: 60mm ETX
Type: R
Vendor: Meade
Aperture: 60.0 mm
Focal length: 350.0 mm
Light grasp (efficiency): 0.9600

Optics: 90mm
Type: R
Vendor: Orion
Aperture: 90.0 mm
Focal length: 910.0 mm
Light grasp (efficiency): 0.9600

Optics: 90mm APO
Type: R
Vendor: Williams Optics
Aperture: 90.0 mm
Focal length: 621.0 mm
Light grasp (efficiency): 0.9600

Eyepiece: Celestron XL 12mm
Vendor: Celestron XL
Focal length: 12.0 mm
Apparent field of view: 60.0°

Eyepiece: Radian 14mm
Vendor: Tele Vue
Focal length: 14.0 mm
Apparent field of view: 60.0°

Eyepiece: Panoptic 19mm
Vendor: Tele Vue
Focal length: 19.0 mm
Apparent field of view: 68.0°

Eyepiece: 20mm
Vendor: Meade
Focal length: 20.0 mm
Apparent field of view: 68.0°

Eyepiece: EF 27mm
Vendor: Smart Astronomy
Focal length: 27.0 mm
Apparent field of view: 53.0°

Eyepiece: 8.8mm
Vendor: Explore Scientific
Focal length: 8.8 mm
Apparent field of view: 82.0°

Eyepiece: TMB 9mm
Vendor: TMB
Focal length: 9.0 mm
Apparent field of view: 58.0°

Filter: Broadband
Type: broad band

//

 

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